Resorption

(redirected from Root resorption)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

resorption

[rē′sȯrp·shən]
(petrology)
The process by which a magma redissolves previously crystallized minerals.
(physics)
Absorption or, less commonly, adsorption of material by a body or system from which the material was previously released.

Resorption

 

(1) In physiology, repeated assimilation; the same as absorption.

(2) In pathology and pathological physiology, the same as resolution. In cases of leukoses, for example, resorption of the bone develops very intensively and is accompanied by rarefaction and the complete resolution of the bony frame.

References in periodicals archive ?
Icariin regulates osteoclast differentiation via the OPG/RANKL ratio, evoking a reparative effect on rapid palatal expansion induced root resorption in rats.
Internal root resorption was regarded as a failure in all instances.
Authored by Karl Keiser, DDS, MS, an associate professor and interim director of Advanced Education in Endodontics at the University of Texas Health Science Center, this guide presents an overview of the various types of tooth root resorption and discusses diagnosis, management and associated prognoses of teeth affected with this condition.
Root resorption was observed in 81 cases (77%) and in more than 58 cases (55%) this was inflammatory root resorption.
Follow-up: Post-operative restorative and orthodontic treatment was completed and four-year review demonstrated continued pulp and periodontal health with no evidence of periapical pathology or root resorption (Figure 2c-d).
However, root resorption and superimposition of permanent successors over primary root apices may obscure root canal length determination through radiographs.
However, the lamina dura around the involved roots in SBCs remains intact and root resorption is almost never found [Horner et al.
Kurol and Thilander [1984] reported that root resorption occurred in 21 of 36 mandibular second primary molar roots when there was underlying aplasia.
Root resorption was detected in 17 of the 55 teeth and for the affected teeth the Andersson index had a mean value of 4.
For the patient it took a number of years for the granulation tissue to ingress into the canal of 11 and for root resorption to commence.
Signs or symptoms of inflammation extending beyond coronal pulp, such as swelling, excessive mobility not due to physiological root resorption, furcal or periapical radiolucency, pathologic root resorption and excessive bleeding from amputated radicular stumps are contraindications [Fuks, 2000].
It has been postulated that ankylosis can develop during the intermittent processes of root resorption and bone deposition, which occur in the physiological resorption of the primary tooth root [Kurol and Magnusson, 1984].