Rothko


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Rothko

Mark. 1903--70, US abstract expressionist painter, born in Russia
References in periodicals archive ?
I am indebted to her account of the general motifs and strategies she identifies, but I produce a different reading of the intersection of Jewishness and art for Rothko.
Rothko, below, one of the most cele-brated postwar American artists, created the work in 1958, at the peak of his career.
Some pieces - including the Rothko -- have been loaned to museums in the U.
Rothko gifted the painting to the Tate shortly before his death in 1969.
While one might think there is not much more to be said about Rothko and the spiritual, it is encouraging to see this issue discussed with such acuity, drawing on Hegel's conception of spirit in relation to art.
Today, a Pollock or Rothko retrospective will draw huge crowds.
Indeed, the power of this production lies in its ability to transport the listener to a hyperemotional plane, something Wilson's vaunted lighting effects - here Vermeer, there Rothko - help engender.
The Artist's Reality Mark Rothko, edited and with an introduction by Christopher Rothko (November 2004), 16.
With the potency of Tate Modern's Rothko Room, punctuating Bankside's otherwise white on white galleries, To Breathe The Shadow creates a dramatic sacred space within Piano and Roger's dominant art machine.
Baigell argues that "non-representational" works by Jewish artists such as Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko demonstrate in sublimated and opaque forms their response to the Holocaust through a traumatic idiom that acknowledges the unrepresentable nature of the event.
As for the art, there's a lot of it, some by famous 20th century names such as Mondrian, Warhol, Pollock, Rothko and Bacon, but much more by unknowns whose creations had been mouldering in Tate warehouses around London--where they belong.
In contrast to the Part, Morton Feldman's Rothko Chapel is a direct response to his environment - the work is a tribute to the building.