decomposition

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Related to Rotting flesh: gangrene

decomposition

[dē‚käm·pə′zish·ən]
(chemistry)
The more or less permanent structural breakdown of a molecule into simpler molecules or atoms.
(geochemistry)
(mathematics)
The expression of a fraction as a sum of partial fractions.
The representation of a set as the union of pairwise disjoint subsets.
References in periodicals archive ?
As microbes slowly break down tissue, they release stinky chemicals that signal rotting flesh.
The decomposing body of a man in his underwear was discovered after an Egyptian doorman for a local resort tried to identify the source of the foul smell of rotting flesh.
More likely, it was because they were too busy braying, incessantly and self-importantly, into their cell phones, arranging power lunches and stock transactions, each of which translated, conveniently out of sight, mind and smelling distance into the starved and rotting flesh of infants.
If it's dark and green like rotting flesh, stuff it in a cup.
Just as Hansel and Gretel's gingerbread witch finally turns out to be a bit of a pussyfoot, too easily outfoxed to be a real danger, so too do the sugary transformations of rotting flesh in "Metamorphosis," comprised of three sculptures by Montreal-born, U.
It's overpowering when you have the smell of rotting flesh.
But, Defra yesterday said a fresh inquiry would be pointless because no new evidence was revealed in the video that shows a pile of smoldering rubbish 6ft high and 40ft across with rotting flesh, bones, decaying food and sandwich wrappers among the refuse.
At the ends of unnaturally long arms the hands are stiffened in a cramp, the shoulders are dislocated, while the knees are turned in, and the feet--one nailed on top of the other--are a heap of muscles beneath rotting flesh and blue toenails.
Gruesome to the extreme, there follows a description of the grandmother's increasingly rotting flesh.
You can smell the rotting flesh in the WWI trenches.
They mimic the smell of rotting flesh and attract insects normally drawn to carrion.
The most stunning scene shows a number of the bears feasting on the corpse of a beached whale and wallowing in its rotting flesh.