Ruffianism


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Ruffianism

Brown shirts
(S.A.) Nazi militia who terrorized citizens. [Germ. Hist.: WB, H:238]
droogs
Alex’s rough and tough band of hooligans. [Br. Lit.: A Clockwork Orange]
Hawkubites
London toughs; terrorized old men, women, and children (1711-1714). [Br. Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 406]
Jackmen
medieval para-military thugs. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 463]
Jets and Sharks
hostile street gangs. [Am. Lit. and Cinema: West Side Story]
Mohocks
bullies terrorizing London streets in 18th century. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 720]
Scowerers
London hooligans, at turn of the 18th century. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 972]
Tityre Tus
young bullies in late 17th-century London. [Br. Hist: Brewer Dictionary, 1087]
References in periodicals archive ?
Faulkner, Caldwell, Wolfe, and others had carried social frankness to lengths that were shocking even to her, so that, in her own words, `realism had so often degenerated into literary ruffianism.
He associates the outbreak of residential bombing with "an exhibition of ruffianism in our public parks" (the pronominally integrationist emphasis on public spaces is characteristic of Abbott's style).
Stars in heaven, there wasn't any ruffianism that sergeant wasn't up to.