Ruffianism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

Ruffianism

Brown shirts
(S.A.) Nazi militia who terrorized citizens. [Germ. Hist.: WB, H:238]
droogs
Alex’s rough and tough band of hooligans. [Br. Lit.: A Clockwork Orange]
Hawkubites
London toughs; terrorized old men, women, and children (1711-1714). [Br. Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 406]
Jackmen
medieval para-military thugs. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 463]
Jets and Sharks
hostile street gangs. [Am. Lit. and Cinema: West Side Story]
Mohocks
bullies terrorizing London streets in 18th century. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 720]
Scowerers
London hooligans, at turn of the 18th century. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 972]
Tityre Tus
young bullies in late 17th-century London. [Br. Hist: Brewer Dictionary, 1087]
References in periodicals archive ?
The compadritos performed ruffianism either as low-class picaresque characters placed in the tenement houses or dressed in tail coats, drinking champagne, in a cabaret.
He associates the outbreak of residential bombing with "an exhibition of ruffianism in our public parks" (the pronominally integrationist emphasis on public spaces is characteristic of Abbott's style).
Stars in heaven, there wasn't any ruffianism that sergeant wasn't up to.
This chilling evangelical work describes Derby Day as ``a seething mass of ruffianism, in a stifling atmosphere, polluted by the smell of ale and the reeking breath of tipsy people'' - which goes to show that some things on Derby Day just don't change.
Some years before the war, baseball began to enjoy a renewal of interest after the arrival of the American League and a general cleaning-up of the game's image after the labor wars and ruffianism of the 1890s.