Rundstedt


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Related to Rundstedt: Karl Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt

Rundstedt

Karl Rudolf Gerd von . 1875--1953, German field marshal; directed the conquest of Poland and France in World War II; commander of the Western Front (1942--44); led the Ardennes counteroffensive (Dec. 1944)
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Caption: He merely accepted the orders: Forces under the military leadership of General Gerd von Rundstedt achieved the shocking breakthrough of French lines, trapping the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) at Dunkirk.
Captured after the war, von Rundstedt was interrogated to determine, among other things, how successful the Allies had been in thwarting the German military.
As the Polish army comprised fewer than one million men, Poland tried to mobilise reservists but this was far from complete when the blow fell from 630,000 German troops under Bock and 886,000 under Rundstedt.
Rundstedt cited in POW Interviews, "Rundstedt," 20 May 1945, Sheffield Edwards Papers, US Army Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, PA; others cited in Hughes, Over Lord, 151.
Others include the German Gerd von Rundstedt, the British Hugh Dowding, the Soviet Georgy Zhukov, the Japanese Isoroku Yamamoto, and the American Chester Nimitz.
Among them was Field Marshal von Rundstedt, who attended church in Bridgend and sometimes took afternoon tea with the vicar - after, it was said, delivering milk in the town.
Not since Pearl Harbor had the Americans received so rude a shock as when the dawn of December 16, 1944 was broken by the thunder of a thousand German guns, heralding the onslaught of what the Germans called "The von Rundstedt Offensive," named after their commanding officer on the Western Front.
From the Annex 2227 morning report for September 17, 1944 by Field Marshall Gerd van Rundstedt to Field Marshall Walter Model at the headquarters of Oberbefeblsbaber West at Aremberg, near Koblenz
Manstein's plan, no matter how brilliant, would never have seen the light of day had it not been given a sympathetic hearing not only by Hitler--bold ideas were very much to his liking--but also by Manstein's rather conservative-minded commander, General Gerd von Rundstedt.
The front page also recorded that General Von Rundstedt had been captured by the Allies and that the last `All Clear' had sounded.
Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt, German theater commander in the West, described an "unbearable" Allied air superiority that had made "daylight movement impossible.
The topics given more than a little attention include the dispute between Erwin Rommel and Gerd von Rundstedt, nominal commander of the Western Front, on how best to defend the Atlantic Wall; the plot to assassinate Hitler, Rommel's association with it, and the effect it had on how the German army fought in Normandy; and the paralysis of command on the German Western Front brought about by Hitler's meddling in what should have been the theater commanders' purview.