Ruritania


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Ruritania

1. an imaginary kingdom of central Europe: setting of several novels by Anthony Hope, esp The Prisoner of Zenda (1894)
2. any setting of adventure, romance, and intrigue

Ruritania

imaginary pre-WWI kingdom, rife with political machinations. [Br. Lit.: Prisoner of Zenda]
References in periodicals archive ?
The suggestion Hope makes is that it is in the nurturing person of Princess Flavia that a political, if not a biological, future for Ruritania can be assured.
Oh, how we'll savour seeing Outer Ruritania defeat the Republic of Krazpo on penalties
While Ruritanians making a constitution for Ruritania may be starting from scratch, there are purveyors of foreign experience ready to help, just as there are search firms ready to help a university committee find the right president.
king of Ruritania, prisoner freed from Zenda and engaged
Once upon a time there was a makey-uppy land called Ruritania, which became a byword for romantic muddle, courtly intrigue and gormless people with ridiculous titles, wearing comic-opera uniforms, dripping with medals and decorations they had never earned.
I also assume that Ruritania initially has its own distinct monetary unit, which I will call the peso, and a monetary base consisting of a stock of IOUs issued by its central bank.
The story of Yolanda and the Thief, adapted by Irving Brecher from a treatment by Ludwig Bemelmans, unfolds in a Latin American Ruritania known as Patria, whose industry and wealth are controlled as a monopoly by the Aquaviva family.
A radical translator may as well go against the assertion of the Ruritania myth, a mystification of Eastern Europe and the Balkans (rather as a unified mass, yet Romania, Bulgaria and Albania are mentioned in particular), which is executed mainly by affirming the Gothic stereotypes about Transylvania and Albania.
Joe Lawyer, admitted to practice in Pennsylvania, with his office in Pittsburgh, represents a Pittsburgh client selling widgets to the government of the sovereign state of Ruritania.
This was Ruritania meets the Royal Variety Show and it was quite magical.
Evarchia is, in fact, a sort of Kafkaesque/Firbankian Ruritania, where a simple request for the eponymous chairs leads to the setting up of obstructionist committees, and where the queen is a pigeon-loving (which is not at all the same thing as "pigeon-fancying") vegetarian.