Ruritania

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Ruritania

1. an imaginary kingdom of central Europe: setting of several novels by Anthony Hope, esp The Prisoner of Zenda (1894)
2. any setting of adventure, romance, and intrigue

Ruritania

imaginary pre-WWI kingdom, rife with political machinations. [Br. Lit.: Prisoner of Zenda]
References in periodicals archive ?
a) 'Replacement courts': Ruritanian courts would owe no duty of allegiance to Australia, (165) but would retain jurisdiction to deal with matters of a non-military nature that do not affect the safety of Australian forces.
The consensual quality of agency relationships creates a dilemma if the circumstances under which a loan could be avoided by Ruritanian citizens turn on the reputation of the Ruritanian regime that incurred the debt.
33) The Ruritanian context appears to lack two defining elements of a trust: (1) a settlor, whose intention it is to create the relationship; and (2) a corpus, the property the trust relationship concerns.
Admirable though these histories are -- it has been justly said that they almost read like romantic novels -- and although they have recently been used in hard-pressed Ruritanian schools after the rejection of Communist text-books, they inevitably tell us nothing of twentieth-century history in this area of Central Europe.
Certain freak atmospheric conditions in the Ruritanian frontier ranges also made instant TV and even radio contacts extremely difficult.
side but in the Ruritanian capital, among the old town's |hidden populous but wretched lanes and alleys' with their turbulent population.
Although ex-queen Flavia retained a place in the national affections comparable with that accorded to the memory of the Empress Elisabeth as Queen of Hungary, numerous streets in Strlzhava were renamed after heroes and poets of the Great Ruritanian Empire of the 12th century.
This was an important factor once the purge began in 1949 of the |Westerners' and |natives' among the Communists and their allies in the purged puppet parties of the National Ruritanian Front.
The general American rule regarding the assignment of contract rights provides that--except in the case of negotiable instruments (which the Ruritanian loans are not)--"[a]n assignee never gets a better right than the assignor had.
court the Corrupt Loan (which involved, with the lender's knowledge and acquiescence, corruption on the part of Ruritanian officials) could be met by a defense of unclean hands.
126) But the fundamental premise of the American political experiment is that ultimate sovereignty and political authority rests with the people, and it is this premise that likely would guide an American court in applying the law of agency to the legal relationships created by the hypothetical Ruritanian loans.
Applying these principles to our three hypothetical Ruritanian loans yields these conclusions.