Ruskinian Gothic

High Victorian Gothic

A very elaborate, highly detailed interpretation of the Gothic Revival in its last phase, from about 1860 to 1890; may have bands of polychromed masonry and multicolored brickwork or roofing tiles; is heavy in appearance, as exemplified by its massive gables and porches; sometimes called Late Gothic Revival or Ruskinian Gothic. Some architectural historians avoid this designation, regarding the adjective “Victorian” merely as descriptive of an age that encompassed a number of specific exuberant, ornate, and highly decorative architectural styles.
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Funded by the liberal elite of Birmingham, it was built in two phases with the first, designed by Chamberlain, a 'tour de force' of Ruskinian Gothic.
Making up for such outward sobriety, the uncompromising Ruskinian gothic interiors ran riot with elaborate stucco and stencilwork covering the walls and ceilings (Fig.
99), in which the citybased architectural historian reveals that the Gallery "was built in 1877 in Ruskinian Gothic, with the east wing added in 1898".
Polychromatic Ruskinian Gothic architectural features are preserved and will merge into private courtyards, designed by award-winning landscape architects City Design.