Rutebeuf


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Rutebeuf

(rütəböf`), fl. between 1254 and 1285, French poet. He was the author of an early miracle play, Le Miracle de Théophile, and of fabliaux, allegories, saints' lives, and satires. Skillfully using legend, he eloquently attacked social abuses and mocked the flaws of all classes.

Rutebeuf

 

(also Rustebeuf). Born circa 1230 in Champagne; died 1285 in Paris. French poet and playwright.

Rutebeuf wrote satirical verses that reflected medieval urban life, songs about the Crusades, fabliaux, and religious dramas. He also wrote about the lives of saints. He denounced the vices of the nobility, the greed of the urban elite, and the hypocrisy of the clergy. Rutebeuf wrote The Miracle of Theophilus (c. 1261; Russian translation by A. A. Blok, 1907), which deals with a man who sells his soul to the devil.

WORKS

Oeuvres complètes, vols. 1–2. Paris, 1959–60.
In Russian translation:
In Khrestomatiia po zarubezhnoi literature: Literatura srednikh vekov. Moscow, 1953.

REFERENCES

Istoriia frantsuzskoi literatury, vol. 1. Moscow-Leningrad, 1946. Pages 161–63.
Lafeuille, G. Rutebeuf Paris [1966].
Serper, A. Rutebeuf poète satirique. Paris, 1969.
Regalado, N. F. Poetic Patterns in Rutebeuf. New Haven-London, 1970.

A. D. MIKHAILOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: The realization and the follow-up of the artistic programming of the rutebeuf theater for the following seasons 2018-2019; 2019-2020; 2020-2021
Dufournet vinculou, com razao, os testamentos de Villon a este genero representado desde o seculo XIII pelos jongleurs, que enunciavam em primeira pessoa o discurso de uma personagem ficcional, como, por exemplo, o Dit de l'herberie, de Rutebeuf, que representa um vendedor charlatao de remedios.
And here's the even greater truth: to bestow it on one of our last popular poets, the distant relative of Rutebeuf, Villon, and all the minstrels and songsters of solitude and dereliction; to consecrate a troubadour, a bard of the brotherhood of lonely and lost souls; to crown the author of ballads that have been, to borrow Andre Suares' phrase about Rimbaud, 'a moment in the life' of so many people in the 20th and 21st centuries makes a lot more sense than pulling out of a hat the obscure Rudolf Christoph Eucken or picking poor old Sully Prudhomme instead of Tolstoy.
And here's the even greater truth: To bestow it on one of our last popular poets, the distant relative of Rutebeuf, Villon and all the minstrels and songsters of solitude and dereliction; to consecrate a troubadour, a bard of the brotherhood of lonely and lost souls; to crown the author of ballads that have been, to borrow Andre Suares' phrase about Rimbaud, "a moment in the life" of so many people in the 20th and 21st centuries makes a lot more sense than pulling out of a hat the obscure Rudolf Christoph Eucken or picking poor old Sully Prudhomme instead of Tolstoy.
The inaugural column featured a poem by French medieval poet Rutebeuf who broke with the courtly tradition of the troubadours.
Looking at individual manuscript collections of works by Philippe de Novare, Marie de France, Robert de Blois, Adam de la Halle, and Rutebeuf, Mikhailova-Makarius observes a striking pattern in the way in which compilers present these authors and their oeuvres; in each case, the author's life and progression of works are made to mirror the exemplary narrative structure of the saint's life, evolving in their subject matter from youthful love to worldly affairs to divine contemplation.
Pensemos na queixa de Rutebeuf (5): "Em que se transformaram meus amigos?
Were Rutebeuf, Villon, Jeffers, Baudelaire, Bukowski, and Whitman members?
He looks at songs by Gautier de Coinci, Thibaut de Champaigne, Jocques de Cambrai, and Rutebeuf.
81); Chapter 3 studies the trope of poverty in Angiolieri's poetic corpus, looking outward to the goliardic tradition, Rutebeuf, and the Archpoet as well as to medieval Italian sources, and making some interesting claims about the parodic impulse Angiolieri apparently directs towards Franciscanism; Chapter 4 presents Angiolieri as a practitioner of vituperium, connecting him with Rustico di Filippo and reading him, innovatively enough, in a theoretical light cast by Luigi Pirandello; and Chapter 5 reads his (at least purported) poetic correspondences with Dante, the otherwise unknown' Simone', and Dante's defender Guelfo Taviani, in an attempt both to position Angiolieri in the tradition of the tenzone and to assess his cultural impact on his poetic contemporaries and successors.
Preisig's second chapter examines the idea of authorial subjectivity that is developed in Marot's oeuvre, in an analysis that stresses both the revolutionary character of Marot's literary practice and its continuity with medieval poets such as Rutebeuf and Villon.
The Romance of the Rose is interpreted as the confluence of two major trends: Christianized Platonism (which is supposed to come to an end) and the beginning of "contingent subjectivism" which is even more noticeable in the works of "realist" poets such as Rutebeuf and Francois Villon.