Rutherford


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Rutherford

(rŭth`ərfərd), borough (1990 pop. 17,790), Bergen co., NE N.J., a residential suburb of the New York City–N New Jersey metropolitan area; inc. 1881. Several pre-Revolutionary houses remain there.

Rutherford

 

a subsidiary unit of the activity of nuclides (radioactive isotopes) in radioactive samples and sources. The rutherford was named in honor of E. Rutherford. Its symbol is Rd. The rutherford is defined as the activity of any nuclide equal to 106 disintegrations of the given nuclide per second. One curie = 3.700 × 104 Rd. The rutherford was proposed in 1946 but has not been widely accepted; it is practically unused.

rutherford

[′rəth·ər·fərd]
(nucleonics)
Abbreviated rd.
A unit used to express the decay rate of radioactive material, equal to 106 disintegrating atoms per second.
That amount of a substance which is undergoing 106 disintegrations per second.

Rutherford

1. Ernest, 1st Baron. 1871--1937, British physicist, born in New Zealand, who discovered the atomic nucleus (1909). Nobel prize for chemistry 1908
2. Dame Margaret. 1892--1972, British stage and screen actress. Her films include Passport to Pimlico (1949), Murder She Said (1962), and The VIPs (1963)
3. Mark, original name William Hale White. 1831--1913, British novelist and writer, whose work deals with his religious uncertainties: best known for The Autobiography of Mark Rutherford (1881) and the novel The Revolution in Tanner's Lane (1887)
References in classic literature ?
Rutherford had developed of late a habit of patrolling the neighbourhood of Forty-Second Street at theatre-time.
Rutherford, intent on her, noticed none of these things.
The waiter, who had been doubtful about him, was won over, and went off to execute the order, reflecting that it was never safe to judge a man by his clothes, and that Rutherford was probably one of these eccentric young millionaires who didn't care how they dressed.
Peggy was for returning to Alcala by car, but Rutherford refused to countenance such an anti-climax.
From force of habit, Rutherford glanced at the letter-rack on the wall at the foot of the stairs.
Peggy's nightly visits began afresh after this, and the ghost on the table troubled Rutherford no more.
As the play progressed Rutherford was amazed at the completeness of the character he had built.
You're alive, my son,' said Rutherford, admiringly, as he read the sheets.
At last there came the day when the play was finished, when the last line was written, and the last possible alteration made; and later, the day when Rutherford, bearing the brown-paper-covered package under his arm, called at the Players' Club to keep an appointment with Winfield Knight.
Almost from the first Rutherford had a feeling that he had met the man before, that he knew him.
The chuckle from the actor and the sigh of relief from Rutherford were almost simultaneous.
It was only later that Rutherford learned craft and caution.