S-type asteroid


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S-type asteroid

[′es ¦tīp ′as·tə‚rȯid]
(astronomy)
A type of asteroid whose surface is reddish and of moderate albedo, containing pyroxene and olivine silicates, probably mixed with metallic iron, similar to stony iron meteorites.
References in periodicals archive ?
This sequence was followed immediately with images of the nearby S-type asteroid (755) Quintilla using the same sequence of filters, so that the relative intensity of the two objects could be directly compared.
Given the above observations, the task now was to derive the reflectance spectrum of the target object by comparing it with a known reflectance spectrum of an S-type asteroid.
In this paper, (27) Euterpe is used as an example of a typical S-type asteroid as shown in Figure 2 of Ref.
These studies suggest that the small body--only 2,100 feet (640 meters) long--is an S-type asteroid with a rocky composition.
The elemental abundances measured on 433 Eros by the NEAR-Shoemaker spacecraft show with confidence that this archetypal S-type asteroid has the same basic composition as ordinary-chondrite meteorites.
Eros is an S-type asteroid, meaning either that it may consist of primitive rocky material largely unchanged from early in solar-system history or that it melted to produce distinct layers of rock and metal.
S-type asteroids are of a stony composition, and Itokawa is often referred to as a "rubble pile" due to the boulders, rocks and dust all stuck together by gravity (and possibly van der Waals forces).
Although its disk was not resolved, Masursky's reflectivity suggests that it may not be an S-type (stony) asteroid, as had been assumed based on its orbital association with the Eunomia family of S-type asteroids.
They found that the inner asteroid belt is dominated by S-type asteroids.
Spectroscopically, S-type asteroids bear some resemblance to the meteorite varieties called ordinary chondrites and stony-irons, both of which contain the silicate minerals pyroxene and olivine as well as iron.
Chapman has long contended that some kind of "space weathering" has altered the surfaces of S-type asteroids, and now he may have proof.
Carlson, who heads the NIMS team, the object consists of roughly the same material as Ida itself, with a moderately reflective rocky composition common to S-type asteroids.