Saale

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Saale

(zäl`ə), river, c.265 mi (430 km) long, rising in the Fichtelgebirge, central Germany, and flowing generally N through E central Germany, past Jena, Naumberg (the head of navigation), and Halle, to the Elbe River SE of Magdeburg. The Weisser Elster, Ilm, and Unstrut are the chief tributaries. The Saale's picturesque course is flanked by numerous medieval castles. Wheat, barley, and sugar beets are grown in the fertile lower valley. On the upper part of the river are two large reservoirs, which bring tourism and support hydroelectric power plants. It is also called the Sächsische (Saxonian) or Thüringer Saale to distinguish it from the Fränkische (Franconian) Saale, which flows 84 mi (135 km) SW from the Thüringer Wald, through W Germany, to the Main River. The river has become heavily polluted, largely from chemical plants in industrialized regions such as Halle.

Saale

 

a river in the German Democratic Republic and the Federal Republic of Germany (the upper reaches), a left tributary of the Elbe. Length, 427 km; basin area, about 24,000 sq km. It rises in the spurs of the Fichtel Gebirge and flows in a deep forested valley along the Thuringian Plain and, below Naumburg, along the lowlands. Average discharge at Naumburg is 60 cu m per sec, and at the mouth, 100 cu m per sec. The high water levels are in winter and spring. It is navigable 175 km upstream from Naumburg. A system of canals (approximately 20 sluices) begins at Halle. There are a number of hydroelectric stations (at Hohenwarte, Bleiloch, and elsewhere). The cities of Saalfeld, Rudolstadt, Jena, Naumburg, Halle, Bernburg, and Kalbe are situated on the Saale (the GDR).

References in periodicals archive ?
Major excavations and test-pitting demonstrated that within the Saalian interglacial (c.
1984; Raukas & Gaigalas 1993; Raukas & Kajak 1995) Western Europe Estonia Subdivision Horizon Subhorizon Formation Subformation Upper Weichselian Upper Jarva Vortsjarve Pleistocene Middle Savala Lower Valgjarve Kelnase Eemian Prangli Middle Saalian Warthe Ugandi Upper Ugandi Pleistocene Treene?
The most complete Late Saalian to Eemian pollen succession in Estonia is known from the Prangli core section, indicating a gradual change from the Late Saalian limnic and brackish phase to 'normal marine' conditions in the early Eemian (Cheremisinova 1961; Kajak 1961; Liivrand 1987, 1991).
However, regardless of the number of the studied sections, the Eemian strata as well as the underlying supposed Late Saalian non-glacial sediments have not been previously directly dated in this region.
The Arumetsa site is the northernmost one among the few open-cast sections with Saalian sediments in the eastern Baltic region.
Using the maximum ice extension for land-sea correlations poses problems as soon as one exchanges the narrow 'national' perspective for a broader 'European' one: the southernmost extension in Great Britain was the Anglian (= Elsterian), in the Netherlands it was the Saalian ice-cap and in the Don Basin it was the Don glaciation
Since the early Saalian, thinning of the convex sides of the dentine triangles has resulted in changes in the relative thickness of the enamel band of the Arvicola molars.
The till unit (upper till), which outcrops widely alongside the Baltic Sea coast and covers the Pleistocene marine and glaciolacustrine sediment sequence, has been originally referred to as of Saalian age (Dreimanis 1936; Konshin et al.
Palynology and lithostratigraphy of Late Elsterian to Early Saalian aquatic sediments in the Ziemupe-Jurkalne area, Western Latvia.
6), which is located in a Saalian landscape, is presented in Kolstrup (2004), where further details of the wedge fill and samples are given.
Samples Tj 6, Tj 8, and Tj 10 (Table 3) were collected in 1998 from individual fillings of the wedge in order to test whether the crack system had been reused or reactivated during different Saalian and/or Weichselian permafrost periods (see also Kolstrup 1993; Murton & Kolstrup 2003).