Sabine Women

Sabine Women

menfolk absent, Romans carry off women for wives. [Rom. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 948; Flem. Art: Rubens, “Rape of the Sabine Women”]
References in classic literature ?
You are the direct descendant of those Romans who carried off the Sabine women.
Today's nudes are nothing like the Sabine women rising up from an 800-year sleep of chiseled outrage.
Seeing the brothers as a bunch of gauche teens and young men changes the feel of the story (a bunch of strapping Oregon rowdies kidnapping half-a-dozen would-be wives) from creepy - they're inspired by the story of the Sabine women for goodness sake - into something akin to clueless and youthful exuberance.
The painting, The Abduction of the Sabine Women (1633/34), probably that of Nicolas Poussin, was meant to show the abduction of the women, not the sexual attack on them.
The Rape of the Sabine Women (1962), which compares the violence of this episode in Roman History to 20th century events, is also among the works going on display.
This page: Rubens' The Departure of Lot and His Family from Sodom, Jan Steen's The Rape of the Sabine Women, Simon Vouet's Time Discovering the Love of Venus and Mars.
Plutarch, who inspired the libretto for Seven Brides for Seven Brothers with his tale of the rape of the Sabine women, concluded that some soothsayers must be allowed occasionally to get it right, just as some people who shoot often enough must sometimes hit the target.
The contrast with David's treatment of the theme of The Rape of the Sabine Women shows why Picasso, who adhered to the French Communist Party; could never become a propagandist.
Then, after reading about the Roman capture of the Sabine women, Adam develops an inspired solution to his brothers' loneliness - kidnap the women they want
In 1810, after Girodet won a major competition, beating David's famous canvas, "The Rape of the Sabine Women," the relationship between the artists deteriorated.
The vital anatomical forms of his portraits of models, such as bodybuilder Lisa Lyon and the statuesque Derrick Cross, find their roots in antiquity, and in this exhibition find their mirror in such Mannerist prints as Jan Harmensz Muller's Rape of the Sabine Women and Jacob Matham's Apollo in the Clouds.