Saccopastore

Saccopastore

 

a site on the outskirts of Rome, where two skulls of Palaeoanthropus were found—a female’s in 1929 and a male’s in 1935—in a sandy pit along with Mousterian stone weapons. The skulls had characteristics common to the skulls of Palaeoanthropus, such as a developed supraorbital ridge and a receding forehead. They also resembled the skull of modern man in some respects. The bones of fossil animals were also found, including those of an ancient elephant, hippopotamus, and Merck’s rhinocerus (Diceros merki). This indicates that the people of Saccopastore lived during a warm part of the last interglacial period (Riss-Würm). The absolute age of the people is about 100,000 years.

References in periodicals archive ?
Saccopastore is another, where a second individual was found in a different layer in the same sequence six years after the first.
Site Date Element(s) Ngandong (Solo), Indonesia 1931-3, 1976-80 14 crania, 2 tibiae, 1 innominate fragment Trinil, Indonesia 1891-1900 Calotte, 2 teeth and perhaps 5 femora Mauer, Germany 1907 Mandible Saccopastore I 1929 Cranium Saccopastore II 1935 Cranium Steinheim, Germany 1933 Calvaria Swanscombe, U.
Given that there is a large number of transitional forms, the delimitation remains flexible and some authors include in this taxon the previously mentioned Ehringsdorf remains and those from the Saccopastore quarry a few kilometers from Rome, which are usually considered to belong to archaic Homo sapiens.