Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy


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Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy

The nearest galaxy to our own, the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy was discovered in 1994, at a distance of only 24 kpc. Its detection is comparatively recent because it is faint, and its proximity means that its constituent stars are spread over a large part of the sky, heavily obscured by the many foreground stars of our own Milky Way. The galaxy is thought to be slowly being torn apart by the gravitational force of our own Galaxy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy has mistakenly challenged the Milky Way: no bantamweight beats a heavyweight.
Each halo also has streams of stars that are almost certainly the debris of unlucky cosmic contestants--systems similar to the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy.
The Milky Way is currently munching on the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy (Sgr dSph), whose core coincides with the globular cluster M54, located 87,000 light-years away from us on the opposite side of our galaxy.
It is also thought to be part of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy, yet it's 12,000 light-years closer to us.
Others originate from the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy and from Palomar 5, a 12th-magnitude globular cluster in Serpens (illustrated here).
Heather Morrison (Case Western Reserve University) described a dramatic example: the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy that is currently merging with the Milky Way's disk on the far side of the galaxy from the Sun.
They lie at the same distance as the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy, the Milky Way's nearest neighbor.