Sagnac effect


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Sagnac effect

[′sän·yäk i‚fekt]
(optics)
The shift in interference fringes from two coherent light beams traveling in opposite directions around a ring when the ring is rotated about an axis perpendicular to the ring.
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The centenary of Sagnac effect and its applications: From electromagnetic to matter waves.
Light transmission and the Sagnac effect on the rotating earth.
The synchronization problem is partly a result of the Sagnac effect, a phenomenon that causes clocks in a rotating system (in this case, the earth) to be out of sync with one another when viewed from a stationary frame.
Besides these he was the first person among the scientists, who had registered the Sagnac effect at radiowaves.
to measure the Sagnac effect at radio waves employing a cable of the 244 m length coiled round a barrel [5].
This is the Sagnac effect, a piece of physics so obscure that it does not even have an index entry in the 15-volume McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology.
Read more on the Sagnac effect and explanations of it in my recent papers [12,13].
The Sagnac interferometer is based on the Sagnac effect, reported by G.
This Sagnac effect can also be amplified by an interferometer that is in orbit, where the orbital velocity of the interferometer with respect to the Earth's surface produces an increased phase shift.
On the other hand, periodic boundary conditions or close space-time topology, such as the Sagnac effect [3] where two opposite light beams travel in different time intervals the same closed path on a rotating disk, as well as the twin paradox, leads to preferred frame effects.
The above conclusion is reinforced by the generalized Sagnac effect [6] observed in a light waveguide loop consisting of linearly and circularly segments, any segment of the loop contributes to the phase difference between two counter-propagating light beams in the loop.
The Yilmaz equations contain the correct terms, and they have been applied with success to various vexing problems, for example the precession of Mercury's perihelion, lunar laser ranging measurements, the flying of atomic clocks in aircraft, the relativistic behaviour of clocks in the GPS, and the predicted Sagnac effect in the one-way speed of light on a rotating table.