Salò Republic

(redirected from Salo republic)

Salò Republic

 

a fascist puppet regime established in Italy in September 1943, during World War II, when Italy was occupied by fascist German troops.

Mussolini was the head of the Salò Republic, whose official name was the Italian Social Republic. The chief ministries were located in the city of Salò. The main tenets of fascist policy were set forth in what was called the Verona Charter of November 1943, which contained numerous demagogic anticapitalist promises. The actual policies pursued by the rulers of the republic were to subordinate the country completely to Hitlerite Germany. The Salò Republic came to an end with the antifascist April Uprising of 1945, in which the leaders of the puppet regime, including Mussolini, were executed by partisans.

References in periodicals archive ?
Arthurs also looks at the Salo Republic, where the rhetoric of romanita conflicted with a pro-German stance and the desire to elide the regime's failures in the war.
Gregor devotes a chapter and more to denying that racist philosopher Julius Evola was a fascist, and he also reviews, if in an indirect and confused manner, the fascism of the Salo Republic [1943-1945].
On the western side of the lake, about 20 minutes from the historic town of Salo, in the charming little village of Gargnano, is the Villa Feltrinelli, once the home of Benito Mussolini during the days of the Salo Republic.
Experts on fascism claim that Fini makes a distinction between the criminal period of fascism - the alliance with Hitler's Germany, the racial laws, the Salo Republic (the puppet regime set up in Northern Italy by Hitler under the dictator Benito Mussolini in 1943) - and the period of `good fascism' prior to the legislation of the racial laws in 1938.
Douglas, and culminated in Pound's journalistic pronouncements in Popolo di Alessandria during the period of Mussolini's short-lived Salo Republic in 1943-4.
But Mirko Tremaglia, the new chairman of the foreign affairs commission of the lower house, is old enough to have served Il Duce's regime at its worst during the Salo Republic.
Queen Elizabeth, putting both out of action for several months (night of December 18-19); as commander of the entire 10th Light Flotilla (May 1943), he continued to direct operations against British ships at Gibraltar, destroying 73,000 tons of shipping at a cost of three men killed and three captured; his operations were suspended by the armistice with the Allies (September), at which time he was planning an attack on New York; later commanded a special antipartisan force for Mussolini's so-called Salo Republic in northern Italy (1943-1945); dabbled in neo-Fascist politics after the war, and died near Rome (1974).
More seriously, Laqueur claims that sooner or later all the left-wing elements in Italian and German fascism were suppressed, failing to bring out the return to radicalism in the program of the Salo Republic (1943-1945), a phase that he vaguely describes as very similar in inspiration to Nazi Germany.