Samuel Butler


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Butler, Samuel,

1612–80, English poet and satirist. During the Puritan Revolution he served Sir Samuel Luke, a noted officer of Cromwell. After the restoration of Charles II, he wrote his famous mock-heroic poem Hudibras (pub. in 3 parts, 1663, 1664, 1678), an envenomed satire against the Puritans in which Luke was the model for the butt Sir Hudibras. He was also the author of other verse satires, some of them not published until the 20th cent.

Bibliography

See J. Wilders' edition of Hudibras (1967); biography by T. Penelhum (1985); studies by H. DeQuehen, ed. (1979) and T. L. Jeffers (1981).


Butler, Samuel,

1835–1902, English author. He was the son and grandson of eminent clergymen. In 1859, refusing to be ordained, he went to New Zealand, where he established a sheep farm and in a few years made a modest fortune. He returned to England in 1864 and devoted himself to a variety of interests, including art, music, biology, and literature. Besides exhibiting some of his paintings (1868–76) at the Royal Academy, he composed several works in collaboration with Henry Festings Jones, among them the Handelian Narcissus: A Dramatic Cantata (1888). His Erewhon, in which he satirized English social and economic injustices by describing a country in which manners and laws were the reverse of those in England, appeared in 1872. It brought Butler immediate literary fame. Erewhon Revisited was published in 1901. Butler opposed Darwin's explanation of evolution, finding it too mechanistic, and he expounded his own theories in Evolution Old and New (1879), Unconscious Memory (1880), and Luck or Cunning as the Main Means of Organic Modification? (1887). In his single novel, the autobiographical The Way of All Flesh (1903), he attacked the Victorian pattern of life, in particular the ecclesiastical environment in which he was reared. Brilliantly ironic and witty, The Way of All Flesh is ranked among the great English novels. Butler's notebooks were published in 1912.

Bibliography

See selections from the notebooks ed. by G. Keynes and B. Hill (1951). See also A. Sliver, ed., The Family Letters of Samuel Butler, 1841–1886 (1962); biographies by H. F. Jones (1921, repr. 1973), L. E. Holt (1964), and P. Henderson (1953, repr. 1967); study by W. G. Becker (1925, repr. 1964).

Butler, Samuel

 

Born Feb. 8, 1612, in Worcester; died Sept. 25, 1680, in London. English poet and satirist. Son of a small farmer.

Butler began his literary career during the Restoration, the reinstatement of the Stuart dynasty (1660–88). An opponent of the Puritans, Butler was famous for his heroic comic poem Hudibras (parts 1–3, 1663–78), in which the self-satisfied, pedantic Presbyterian judge Sir Hudibras and his squire are portrayed. The poem ridicules the hypocritical manners and religious fanaticism of the bourgeois Puritans. At the same time, in the satire A Burlesque About Lords and Ladies and other works, Butler criticized the aristocracy and courtiers of the Restoration.

WORKS

Satires and Miscellaneous Poetry and Prose. Edited by R. Lamar. Cambridge, 1928.

REFERENCES

Istoriia angliiskoi literatury, vol. 1, issue 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1945.
Burton, K. M. P. Restoration Literature. London, 1958.

Butler, Samuel

 

Born Dec. 4, 1835, at Langar, county of Nottinghamshire; died June 18, 1902, in London. English writer. Son of a clergyman.

After graduating from the university, Butler took holy orders; afterwards, he renounced the career of a clergyman. The hypocrisy of bourgeois morality was unmasked in his antibourgeois satire Erewhon (anagram of the word “nowhere”; 1872) and its sequel Erewhon Revisited (1901). The realistic novel The Way of All Flesh (1903; published posthumously) exposes the falsity of bourgeois family relations.

WORKS

The Shrewsbury Edition of the Works, vols. 1–20. London, 1923–26.
In Russian translation:
Zhiznennyi put’. Moscow, 1938.

REFERENCES

Istoriia angliiskoi literatury, vol. 3. Moscow, 1958.
Anikst, A. A. Istoriia angliiskoi literatury. Moscow, 1956.
Henderson, Ph. Samuel Butler, the Incarnate Bachelor. London 1953.
Harkness, S. B. The Career of Samuel Butler (1835–1902): A Bibliography. London, [1955].
References in periodicals archive ?
The works of Samuel Butler have often been identified as a probable influence on Joyce.
Samuel Butler was of farming stock but the family was prosperous enough to be able to send young Samuel to the King's School in Worcester.
Most entries in the second half come from the middle 1970s, when he was working on 1he Secular Scripture: A Study of the Structure of Romance (1976), and the late 1980s, when he was preparing lectures on Samuel Butler, Henry James, William Morris, and others.
Samuel Butler said, "The greatest pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him, and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself, too.
Samuel Butler put it best when he said, 'The greatest pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him, and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself, too.
In Samuel Butler, not measured truth, but a certain glittering, brittle cleverness, and earnestness without seriousness, has become the cynosure of literary endeavor.
And as Samuel Butler once said, "There's many a good tune played on an old fiddle".
The British author Samuel Butler once said, "It is seldom very hard to do one's duty when one knows what it is, but it is often exceedingly difficult to find this out.
El 17 de abril tuvo lugar una charla sobre la novela Erewhon de Samuel Butler (1835-1902) y los origenes de la filosofia de la tecnologia, a cargo de Luis Camacho.
The original cost was pounds 7562, including pounds 1673 to builder Samuel Butler, pounds 2500 to carver Joseph Wilton, and pounds 315 to the artist who painted eight allegorical scenes on the panel.
The first Pocket Books were a shrewd mix: a few classics (Shakespeare, Samuel Butler, and Emily Bronte), a self-help book (Wake Up and Live
It was that supreme and sometimes successful effort to record and even to revive the dead past, in fact, that eventually led Samuel Butler, once tutored by Peiresc's friend and fellow scholar John Selden, to mock the antiquary as one "Who has no Busnes for the Intellect / But to Transcribe and Copy, and Collect; / .