sandpiper

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Related to Sandpipers: Scolopacidae

sandpiper,

common name for some members of the large family Scolopacidae, small shore birds, including the snipesnipe,
common name for a shore bird of the family Scolopacidae (sandpiper family), native to the Old and New Worlds. The common, or Wilson's snipe (Capella gallinago), also called jacksnipe, is a game bird of marshes and meadows.
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 and the curlewcurlew
, common name for large shore birds of both hemispheres, generally brown and buff in color and with decurved bills. There are eight species, belonging to the genus Numenius. The long-billed curlew, N.
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. Sandpipers are wading birds with relatively long legs and long, slender bills for probing in the sand or mud for their prey—all sorts of small invertebrates. Their plumage is dull, usually streaked brown or gray above and buff with streaks or spots below. Most sandpipers are found in flocks on seacoasts throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but some frequent inland waters and marshes. Except for three species, all sandpipers nest on the ground. The three exceptions, the solitary sandpiper of the New World, and the green and wood sandpipers of the Old World, usually use the abandoned nests of other birds, and nest in trees. Sandpipers fly in irregular, large flocks, with no apparent leader. Among the North American sandpipers are the spotted and solitary sandpipers, found by streams; the Baird's, least, semipalmated, western, and white-rumped sandpipers, collectively called "peeps"; the red-backed sandpiper, or dunlin, and the greater and lesser yellow-legs, the willet, the knot, and the sanderling. Sandpipers are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Charadriiformes, family Scolopacidae.

sandpiper

[′san‚pī·pər]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of various small birds that are related to plovers and that frequent sandy and muddy shores in temperate latitudes; bill is moderately long with a soft, sensitive tip, legs and neck are moderately long, and plumage is streaked brown, gray, or black above and is white below.

sandpiper

1. any of numerous N hemisphere shore birds of the genera Tringa, Calidris, etc., typically having a long slender bill and legs and cryptic plumage: family Scolopacidae, order Charadriiformes
2. any other bird of the family Scolopacidae, which includes snipes and woodcocks
References in periodicals archive ?
The spoon-billed sandpipers habitat must be included within Jiangsus ecological red lines.
However green sandpipers normally prefer warmer climes during the winter.
On purple sandpipers, he added: "They are a rocky shore bird and a major threat to them is disturbance.
Dubai: This year's migratory season is right on track as it welcomes a new bird in town -- the Siberian broad-billed sandpiper.
Rock Sandpipers have the most northerly nonbreeding distribution of any shorebird in the Pacific Basin, and the species is common in Alaska throughout the winter as far north as 61[degrees] N (Gill et al.
The Buff-breasted Sandpipers are quite beautiful and they breed up in the high arctic tundra of North west Canada and winter in the grasslands of Argentina.
Purple sandpiper (front) and redshank Picture: ADRIAN FOSTER
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The purpose of this research was to determine the diet of wintering sandpipers at an inland freshwater reservoir.
CHRIS ASHCROFT, Volunteer Recruitment Officer, Vitalise Sandpipers www.
For example, the male spotted sandpiper tends the young in the nest while the female is out laying eggs elsewhere, Hartmann said of a bird dad whose mate is naughty by nature.
COMMON Sandpipers are enjoying some rest and relaxation by our lakes and rivers before heading to Africa.