Sapphira


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Sapphira

(səfī`rə), wife of AnaniasAnanias
[Gr.,=Heb. Ananiah and Hananiah]. 1 In the Acts of the Apostles, man who, with his wife Sapphira, held back part of a gift to the early Jerusalem church and lied about it. They were rebuked by Peter and fell dead. The name has become a term for liar.
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Sapphira

New Testament the wife of Ananias, who together with her husband was struck dead for fraudulently concealing their wealth from the Church (Acts 5)
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When one looks for Scriptural examples that a client might identify with to discover something of one's own interactional style, one might point to Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5) or Simon Magus (Acts 8) as examples of those with some of the tendencies characteristic of this type.
This is the case with Ananias and Sapphira who, as Cox puts it with amazing brevity, are "Christians on the outside but godless on the inside" (98).
Death Comes for the Archbishop provides the key to viewing Cather's subsequent fiction: the stories in Obscure Destinies (1928-31), especially "Neighbour Rosicky," about a natural father with a life as fulfilling as Latour's; Shadows on the Rock (1931), portraying a French-Canadian counterpart to the faith community of the Archbishop; Lucy Gayheart (1935) and Sapphira and the Slave Girl (1940), both painful sortings out of guilt; and, finally, the story of rebirth, release from bondage after harsh punishment, set in medieval Avignon, France, that Cather left unfinished at her death in 1947.
Callista, who has a younger sister, Sapphira, two, and who lives with her family, mum Alex, and dad John, 38, an engineer, in St Nicolas Park, Nuneaton, will finish her treatment next autumn.
On that note, I might ask how my worthy adversary justifies the (ahem) hit job on poor Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1-11).
This passage, although overly didactic (for a modern novel, not for a "gospel"), and other such negative effects are, in a very general way, similar to the deaths of Ananias and Sapphira in the Books of Acts (5:1-11), who die because they keep back part of the money they had promised to the early church.
11, describing the early church's brief experiment with communism: the disciples agree to turn over all their possessions to the church, and even though we are told that "the whole group of those who believed were of one heart and soul," the system does not last for long, as some rebel against it almost from the start, and a deadly curse is put upon Ananias and Sapphira when they join the group but hold back on some of their property.
An illustrated essay on the significance of quilts in Cather's life and writing, especially Sapphira, brings together notions of female creative expression and a female-centred tradition.
The Acts continues with story of Ananias and Sapphira who sold property and kept part of the money obtained, thereby deceiving the apostles and the Spirit.
In Cather's Sapphira and the Slave Girl, Sapphira's envious hatred of Nancy is the foundation of the author's exploration of the potential moral corruption faced by slaveowning women.
Nancy Wurzel's paper on Willa Cather examined Lucy Gayheart and Sapphira and the Slave Girl to show how Cather exploits the superstitious fear that her disabled characters may provide.
Herbert, Antonia Shimerda, Jean Marie Latour, Sapphira Dodderidge