Saururaceae

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Saururaceae

[‚sȯ·rə′rās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A family of dicotyledonous plants in the order Piperales distinguished by mostly alternate leaves, two to ten ovules per carpel, and carpels distinct or united into a compound ovary.
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Impatiens capensis and Saururus cernuus were second and third, with IV's of 41.
Numerous other species, including Commelina diffusa (climbing dayflower), Heliotropium indicum (Indian heliotrope), Hibiscus moscheutos (crimsoneyed rosemallow), Ludwigia peploides (floating primrosewillow), Ludwigia palustris (marsh seedbox), Lycopus rubellus (taperleaf waterhorehound), Micranthemum umbrosum (shade mudflower), Penthorum sedoides (ditch stonecrop), Pluchea camphorata (Camphor pluchea), and Saururus cernuus (lizards tail) are common.
Two notable herbs occurring here are Saururus cernuus, which was abundant, and Sagittaria latifolia, which occurred only here and in the wet meadow along the river.
Nasturtium and Saururus were more common at intermediate depths in the wide sections of pool where the current is slower than downstream.
Saururus chinensis (SC) was purchased from Dongyang Hurb (Seoul, Korea).
Hepatoprotective constituents of Saururus chinensis roots against tacrine-induced cytotoxicity in human liver-derived HepG2 cells.
Saururus chinensis has been used in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of hepatitis, edema, jaundice, and gonorrhea (Chung and Shin 1990).
tenuissimus 4 7 M H C E Saururus cernuus 4 9 M EH C D Spirodela polyrrhiza 5 7 M H C E Utricularia gibba 4 10 M EH C E Utricularia macrorhiza 5 9 M EH C D Wolffia brasiliensis 6 7 M H C D Wolffia columbiana 5 7 M H C E Zannichellia palustris 6 10 M EH D E Eleocharis palustris 8 10 H EH D E Sparganium emersum 8 10 H EH D D Vallisneria americana 7 7 H H E E Ceratophyllum echinatum 10 10 EH EH E E Myriophyllum verticillatum 10 10 EH EH E E Potamogeton amplifolius 10 10 EH EH Table 2.
At the edge of the swamp, in very shallow water, is a large stand of Saururus cernuus (lizard's tail).
The aerial parts of Saururus chinensis (SC) have been used for the treatment of edema, fever, jaundice, and inflammatory diseases in Korean folk medicine for centuries.
Caltha palustris, Cardamine pensylvanica, Cardamine rhomboidea, and Saururus cernuus are found almost exclusively in the seeps.