Sayat-Nova

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Sayat-Nova

 

(pen name of Aruthin Sayadian). Born 1712 in Tbilisi; died there 1795. Armenian poet.

The son of an artisan, Sayat-Nova became renowned as a gusan (folk singer), composing songs in Armenian, Georgian, and Azerbaijani. For a time, he lived at the court of Irakli II but was exiled as a result of his opposition to the aristocracy. He took vows as a priest and in 1768 retired to the Haghbat Monastery. He was brutally slain when Persian troops invaded Tbilisi.

Sayat-Nova’s poetry is permeated with longing for a life filled with love and harmony. In contrast to medieval religious dogmas, his philosophy of love is optimistic; he treats love as the source of life-giving strength and creative energy. His poetry influenced Armenian, Georgian, and Azerbaijani fine arts.

WORKS

Sayat-Nova [khagher.] Lus gts’ats ashkhatasirut’enov. G. Akhverdyan. Moscow, 1852.
Hayeren, vrats’eren, adrbeshaneren khagheh zhoghovatsu, kazm. Khmb. Ev tsanot’agr. M. Hasrat’yan. Yerevan, 1963.
In Russian translation:
Stikhotvoreniia. Leningrad, 1961.
Sayat-Nova. Pesni: Vperevodakh Valeriia Briusova. Yerevan, 1963.
Lirika [Introductory article by I. Grishashvili.] Moscow, 1963.

REFERENCES

Harut’yunyan, S. Ergi hancharě: Sayat’-Nova. Yerevan, 1963.
Sargsyan, Kh. S. Sayat’-Nova. Yerevan, 1963.

M. M. MKRIAN

References in periodicals archive ?
The three-day ChoirFest Middle East features 14 choirs from Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Sharjah, in addition to the Baghdad Choir from Iraq, which consists of the Armenian group Sayat Nova in Baghdad and singers from the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra.
Shedding facile formal or anecdotal pairings, this exhibition's carefully orchestrated false starts are the most palpable indication that its curators took their cue from Sergei Parajanov's film Sayat Nova (1968) and Serge Daney's 1982 article on it, in which he observes, ".