Scarlet Sister Mary


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Scarlet Sister Mary

seeks divine forgiveness in night of wild prayer. [Am. Lit.: Scarlet Sister Mary]
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JULIA PETERKIN WAS THE DARLING OF THE LITERARY WORLD IN THE LATE 1920s and early 1930s, a well-to-do white South Carolinian who rocketed to fame when her second novel, Scarlet Sister Mary, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1929.
The heroines of Scarlet Sister Mary and Their Eyes Were Watching God are strong, sexy, free spirits who live as they please and thumb their noses at convention.
That summer, while Julia Peterkin awaited the publication of Scarlet Sister Mary, Zora Neale Hurston was making her way back to African Town armed with a movie camera.
Most of Peterkin's literary repertoire, particularly her acclaimed novels Black April (1927), Scarlet Sister Mary (1928), (3) and Bright Skin (1932), however, focuses on and through black characters.
Regardless of whether Peterkin read this essay, the depth to which the content and form of Black April, Scarlet Sister Mary, and Bright Skin address Mencken's observations is highly suggestive (especially given that Peterkin sought his approval and assistance).
Among books published this year was Scarlet Sister Mary by Julia Peterkin, a realistic and sympathetic chronicling of the life of a black woman on a South Carolina plantation.
lt;IR> ROARK BRADFORD </IR> gave us <IR> OL MAN AN' HIS CHILLUN </IR> , and such works as <IR> GREEN PASTURES </IR> , <IR> PORGY </IR> , and <IR> SCARLET SISTER MARY </IR> present authentic folk materials.
Southern Conceptions: Feminist Procreation in Julia Peterkin's Scarlet Sister Mary and Frances Newman's The Hard-Boiled Virgin.
Her novel <IR> SCARLET SISTER MARY </IR> (1928) won a Pulitzer Prize and was dramatized (1930) by Daniel Reed; the play was performed by a white cast, headed by Ethel Barrymore, in blackface.
Elizabeth Madox Roberts in The Time of Man (1926) set her novel among the poor white tenant farmers of Kentucky; Julia Peterkin in Scarlet Sister Mary (1928) portrayed the rural Gullah community on an abandoned South Carolina plantation; and Zora Neale Hurston in the more familiar Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937) used the small town of Eatonville and the muck of south Florida as the setting for Janie's life story.
The first part of Peterkin's Scarlet Sister Mary parallels the narrative created in The Time of Man.
The book for which Peterkin received the Pulitzer Prize, Scarlet Sister Mary (1928), is one such example.