scar

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scar,

fibrous connective tissueconnective tissue,
supportive tissue widely distributed in the body, characterized by large amounts of intercellular substance and relatively few cells. The intercellular material, or matrix, is produced by the cells and gives the tissue its particular character.
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 that forms at the site of injury or disease in any tissue of the body. Scar tissue may replace injured skin and underlying muscle, damaged heart muscle, or diseased areas of internal organs such as the liver. Dense and thick, it is usually paler than the surrounding tissue because it is poorly supplied with blood, and although it structurally replaces destroyed tissue, it cannot perform the functions of the missing tissue. Scar tissue may therefore limit the range of muscle movement or prevent proper circulation of fluids when affecting the lymphatic or circulatory system. Extensively scarred tissue may lose its ability to function normally.

Scar

 

the end result of the development of connective tissue at the site of the healing of a wound or ulcer. The timely surgical treatment of an incised wound with smooth margins leaves a soft and sometimes barely noticeable linear scar. Large wounds that suppurate and heal by second intention form granulations and subsequently epithelize, resulting in the formation of broad scars that are attached to underlying tissues.

Excessive scar tissue that is elevated above the skin surface is called a keloid. Extensive scars formed after burns or the prolonged healing of suppurative wounds in the area of extremity joints or on the neck result in a limitation of mobility, or contracture; these scars require plastic surgery. Scars that develop after the healing of gastric or duodenal ulcers often lead to the deformation of the stomach and duodenum, the disruption of evacuation from the stomach, and the development of pyloric stenosis.

scar

[skär]
(geology)
A steep, rocky eminence, such as a cliff or precipice, where bare rock is well exposed. Also known as scaur; scaw.
(medicine)
A permanent mark on the skin or other tissue, formed from connective-tissue replacement of tissue destroyed by a wound or disease process.

scar

1
1. any mark left on the skin or other tissue following the healing of a wound
2. the mark on a plant indicating the former point of attachment of a part, esp the attachment of a leaf to a stem

scar

2
1. an irregular enlongated trench-like feature on a land surface that often exposes bedrock
2. a similar formation in a river or sea
References in periodicals archive ?
Atrophic scars may be treated with AFR or NAFR, while red atrophic scars may improve with a combination AFR or NAFR and a pulsed-dye laser, she said.
The online availability of scar treatment products, such as scar treating creams, sprays, oils, gels leads to increased accessibility of these products.
Hypertrophic scars - red, raised scars that form along a wound and can remain this way for a number of years.
Similarly, Beiersdorf AG, the maker of Curad bandages, offers Curad Scar Therapy cosmetic pads, another product marketed mainly to women concerned about scars from caesarean deliveries or minor surgery.
The report analyses the North America scar treatment market in terms of market value (US$ Mn) on the basis of treatment, product type, distribution channel, and country.
Objective evaluation of burn and post-surgical scars and the accuracy of subjective scar type judgment.
We set out to evaluate the rates of pathologic upgrade on excision of small ([less than or equal to] 5 mm) radial scars without atypia diagnosed in NCBs with a particular interest in identifying a subset of these patients who may benefit from conservative management.
Conclusion Both treatments are equally effective and safe for the treatment of acne scars.
According to market research data cited by Oculus, there are about 62 million scars formed annually in the United States, and overall about 93 million Americans have incurred some type of scar.
Since the distribution between high and low SBSES scores was very skewed, no correlation could be found between the length of the incision and the resulting esthetic appearance, in addition, the 12 weeks skin tape and silicone gel scars with excellent to good results (4.
The time for developing these types of scars is usually within four to eight weeks after the wound, followed by further scar growth (up to six months) and then gradual regression over a few years.
Seventy Percent Success Rates with Laser Treatment for Excessive Scars