Schlieffen


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Related to Schlieffen: Alfred von Schlieffen

Schlieffen

Alfred , Count von Schlieffen. 1833--1913, German field marshal, who devised the Schlieffen Plan (1905): it was intended to ensure German victory over a Franco-Russian alliance by holding off Russia with minimal strength and swiftly defeating France by a massive flanking movement through the Low Countries. In a modified form, it was unsuccessfully employed in World War I (1914)
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The Schlieffen Plan has a fascination for many people.
In the end, we can see that the failures of coalition warfare led to the initial successes of the Schlieffen Plan.
Alfred von Schlieffen (1833-1913) was one of those who quickly learned how to side-step the kaiser's interference.
Even had the Schlieffen Plan worked in 1914, and enabled the German army to capture Paris, the question must then follow: would France have surrendered?
Indirectly it was the historian and publicist Hans Delbruck (1848-1929) who brought the Schlieffen Plan to the attention of the public, in early 1919.
Germany's war plan, first developed after 1890 and then refined most famously as the Schlieffen Plan memorialized in 1905, addressed the problem of possible simultaneous wars with France and Russia by a preemptive march through Belgium to knock France out of the war.
Perhaps in an effort to deny a German commitment to logistical fantasies, recent historiography has moved from the viability to the existence of the Schlieffen Plan.
Most conceptual work in German military history concentrates on intellectuals, staff officers like Clausewitz and Schlieffen.
Furthermore, to illustrate how the economic principles will be applied in a historical context, they use the familiar example of the Schlieffen Plan, Germany's invasion of Belgium and France in 1914, as a template for the rest of the book's methodology.
Fear, as Germany could not muster the men it needed to fulfill its security requirements as laid out in the Schlieffen Plan.
Some critics argue that Plan Gelb was an unimaginative copy of the World War I von Schlieffen plan.
War Office plans centered around Germany's previously announced Schlieffen plan to invade Belgium and France.