Scholia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

Scholia

 

explanatory notes on the margins of classical (mainly Greek) and medieval manuscripts. The term is first encountered in the works of Galen (second century A.D). Unlike commentaries, scholia did not explicate the text as a whole; they dealt with individual passages in Greek and Roman classics, in the Bible, and in works by early Christian writers.

The first scholiast is considered to be the grammarian Didymus Chalcenterus of Alexandria (first century A.D). Ancient scholia are those by such early Greek philologists as Aristarchus of Samothrace and Zenodotus of Ephesus; new scholia date from the later classical and medieval periods. Many medieval scholia are anonymous. The writing of scholia came to an end in the 15th and 16th centuries.

References in periodicals archive ?
If we push just slightly on the presupposition that underlies the edifice of the whole--that Cassian the Sabaite is the author of a vast island of pseudonymous material--the undisputed foundation for critical assessment of the Scholia crumbles.
Dindorf, in 1855, begins the scholia on book 23 with the caption,
Rene Nunlist examines indications of narratological procedure in Greek scholia, noting numerous similarities between ancient and modern narratological concepts, while also stressing that "[t]he scholia do not contain a narratological theory avant la lettre" (p.
4-7; Geer 1962), Kleitarchos in his Scholia to Plato's Republica 337A (Allen et al.
690) (for the full Syriac text and English translation, see Martin Sprengling and William Creighton Graham, Barhebraeus' Scholia on the Old Testament, Part 1: Genesis-II Samuel [Chicago: Univ.
We have ample evidence for this in the Odyssean scholia, the marginal comments in the Homeric manuscripts, some of which derive from commentaries as ancient as those of the Alexandrian scholars.
Habitually found in the scholia, these minor caveat lector instances nevertheless warrant mention.
Anne published in prestigious international journals, but her count of articles and chapters in books could have been much higher, had she not devoted so much effort to her teaching, external examining, attending conferences (including FIEC in 1994 and the Leeds International Latin Seminar at which she was a guest speaker), administration, guiding tourists through the Peloponnese and central Greece, Italy, Turkey and Roman Britain, promoting Latin in schools, writing reviews for Scholia (the original departmental newsletter as well as its successor), editing, refereeing, and building Classics through numerous public lectures and talks to the Natal Forum, Rotary, TAFTA and church groups.
In these annotations Szymanski proves to be familiar, not only with the classical sources and the fathers--which are now far more easily, electronically accessible than in the time of the "founding fathers" Heinimann and Kienzele--he also shows an impressive knowledge of Scholia collections, medieval lexica, and other Renaissance cornucopias of Adagia and shows his familiarity with a considerable part of Erasmus's oeuvre.
Theodore Balsamon, Scholia in Concilium Chalcedonense, in PG 137:441; Eng.
Beginning in the Hellenistic period, scholars would add glosses of difficult words in the text, called lemmas, along with commentaries, called scholia (see Grafton, 1997, p.
A chapter on mythological allusions concludes from the changes made by Veldeke to the Roman that, like his French predecessor, he must have been well versed in Virgil and Ovid, as well as in commentaries, scholia and mythographies.