Scriabin


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Scriabin

, Skryabin
Aleksandr Nikolayevich . 1872--1915, Russian composer, whose works came increasingly to express his theosophic beliefs. He wrote many piano works; his orchestral compositions include Prometheus (1911)
References in periodicals archive ?
Your academic work focused on Scriabin, whose music you also perform.
Scriabin shared his obsession with a total work of art with composer Richard Wagner, whose idea was to incorporate music, dance, architecture and artwork in his music dramas.
We are actively cooperating with the governments of states, responsible for preparation of the exhibition," Scriabin said.
He closely examines some of the poetry that Scriabin wrote for his works.
The following evening Yevgenny Sudbin, potentially great pianist of the 21st century at just 27, will play Haydn, Chopin, Scriabin and Ravel.
I would also recommend that Franz Liszt, Alexander Scriabin, Tchaikovsky, and Guillaume de Machaut be regulated according to Refuge's rules.
However, Morrison comments that, ironically, Scriabin did in a way manage to create a collectively authored work by keeping it in sketch form, by creating a framework within which performers could assert their own ideas and views.
One of the group's early inspirations was Alexander Scriabin, a Russian composer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries who dreamed of creating a work of art that would occupy every sense, driving the audience into a transcendental state.
Concerts are shorter - just an hour or so - and without intermission as conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen will demonstrate when he leads the dressed-down orchestra through the music of Shostakovich and Scriabin at the L.
Some of the most important components of the aesthetic of Art Nouveau--strictness of form, dynamic, flowing lines, vagueness, eroticism--can be found in the music of Alexander Scriabin (1872-1915), a Russian composer whose music, very much like Art Nouveau, rose around 1895 and fell into eclipse after World War I until its rediscovery in the 1960s.
Tchaikovsky's "Meditation," Serenade Melancholique," "Elegie," and "Andante Cantabile" will certainly be familiar to most listeners; as will the several bits by Gliere, Scriabin, Mussorgsky, and Shostakovich.