Scylla and Charybdis


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Scylla and Charybdis

rocks and whirlpool, respectively, opposite each other in the Strait of Messina. [Classical Myth.: Zimmerman, 59, 235–236]
See: Danger
References in classic literature ?
THE SIRENS, SCYLLA AND CHARYBDIS, THE CATTLE OF THE SUN.
The small matter which I have chronicled under the heading of "A Study in Scarlet," and that other later one connected with the loss of the Gloria Scott, may serve as examples of this Scylla and Charybdis which are forever threatening the historian.
In her preamble, Circe begins by claiming that Odysseus's path is a matter of choice: one leads to the Clashing Rocks or Planctae, the other to Scylla and Charybdis (Od.
One of resourceful Odyssey's obstacles on his way back home to Ithaca was the legendary monsters Scylla and Charybdis.
In this case, Scylla and Charybdis take the form of:
We know officials often feel as if they walk the tightrope of fair and impartial processes, strung between the Scylla and Charybdis of the Clery Act and Title IX, bound by FERPA and challenged by the media.
This leg of the trip includes a visit to the creepy King Aeolus and his court controlled by the winds, a narrow escape from horrific man-eating creatures, months with the enchantress Circe, a trip to Hades to consult the seer Tiresias and a terrifying trip between Scylla and Charybdis that nearly finishes off the crew.
Shortly before he died, Tyrrell published another collection entitled Through Scylla and Charybdis or the Old Theology and the New, attempting to show how he had tried to avoid the errors of both "Scylla" (the confusion of theology with revelation) and "Charybdis" ("the whirlpool of progress" that had sucked into its vortex so much of the Liberal theology of the 19th century).
Scylla and Charybdis, Heloise and Abelard, the gusting breeze and
This author's lucid, engaging, and humane book navigates the Scylla and Charybdis menacing Samuel Johnson's biographers.
Defining the main risk between Scylla and Charybdis is never easy.
Snaith, an economist at the University of Central Florida,<br /> "Referring to Greek mythology, the BoE finds itself trying to navigate between Scylla and Charybdis.