Scyphomedusae


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Scyphomedusae

[¦sī·fō·mə′dü‚sē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A subclass of the class Scyphozoa characterized by reduced marginal tentacles, tetramerous medusae, and medusalike polyploids.

Scyphomedusae

 

individuals of the medusoid (sexually reproducing) generation of coelenterates of the class Scyphozoa. The umbrella, which may be flat or bell-shaped, is semitransparent and often brightly colored or with colored markings. The margins of the mouth are drawn out into four mouth arms, which are sometimes branched. There are often four, eight, or 16 simple or branching radial canals of the digestive system and a ringshaped canal. The margin of the umbrella has eyespots, statocysts, and, in many cases, marginal tentacles. The umbrella varies in diameter from several centimeters to 2 meters (in Cyanea). All Scyphomedusae except those of the order Stauromedusae live deep in the ocean and are capable of swimming. [25–376–1 ]

References in periodicals archive ?
Report upon the scyphomedusae collected by the United States Bureau of Fisheries steamer "Albatross" in the Philippine Islands and Malay Archipelago.
Predation mortality of bay anchovy Anchoa mitchilli eggs and larvae due to scyphomedusae and ctenophores in Chesapeake Bay.
Relacion entre la distribucion de vientos y la aparicion de Scyphomedusae en el Puerto de Punta del Este (R.
This dual set of diffuse, non-polarized conducting systems in scyphomedusae was noted in behavioral experiments (Eimer, 1874, 1877; Romanes, 1876, 1878; Mayer, 1910; Bozler, 1926a, b), and later demonstrated with electrophy siological recordings by Horridge (1956a, b) and Passano (1965).
Immunohistochemical staining of scyphomedusae with monoclonal antibodies against [alpha]- or [beta]-tubulin shows a subumbrellar nerve net that has the distribution and neuronal characteristics of the motor nerve net that controls the swim musculature (Giant Fiber Nerve Net, also called the Motor Nerve Net; Horridge, 1956a, b; Schwab and Anderson, 1980; Anderson and Schwab, 1981).
The association with scyphomedusae and other large gelatinous zooplankton exhibited by juveniles may continue throughout their lives, because such prey are reported to constitute a considerable portion of the prowfish diet (Carollo and Rankin, 1998).
It could be because they display a horizontal diurnal migration pattern like some hydro- and scyphomedusae (Hamner and Hauri, 1981; Arkett, 1989; Hamner et al.
Similar observations have been made for scyphomedusae that develop from ephyrae, characterized by bells with large clefts separating lappets, into adults with continuous bell morphologies (Higgins et al.
A different perspective on the taxonomic richness and distribution of scyphomedusae is emerging from molecular phylogenetic analyses.
The changes in Reynolds number that occur throughout the development of scyphomedusae have important implications for medusan propulsion.
Trophic impacts of scyphomedusae upon planktonic communities are known to be substantial (Lindahl and Hernroth, 1983; Moller, 1984; Feigenbaum and Kelly, 1984; Behrends and Schneider, 1995), and research on the mechanical basis of prey capture has helped define which constituents of marine planktonic communities are most vulnerable to scyphomedusan predation (Costello and Colin, 1994, 1995; Sullivan et al.