Secondary Revision

Secondary Revision

(dreams)

Secondary revision is Sigmund Freud‘s expression for what he regarded as the final stage of dream production. Freud’s basic understanding of dreams was that they provide an arena within which our often frustrated desires and urges can find expression in fantasy. In most dreams, however, the true meaning of the urge being expressed is disguised from our conscious mind so that the emotions associated with a strong desire do not disturb our sleep. Freud referred to the transforming and disguising process as the dreamwork and identified five mechanisms by which the unconscious mind accomplishes this transformation: displacement, condensation, symbolization, projection, and secondary revision. After undergoing one or more of the other operations, the secondary processes of the ego reorganize the otherwise bizarre components of a dream so that it has a comprehensible surface meaning—a superficial significance that it would otherwise lack.

References in periodicals archive ?
Revisionary Cinema" begins with a discussion of Freud's concept of secondary revision in dreams.
Nevertheless, neither of these limitations hindered our goal of highlighting and documenting the outcomes differences between primary and secondary revision mastoid surgeries.
5) Yeats implies that he had heard Wilde make this remark, though secondary revision on Yeats's part may be at work here.
6) In the Interpretation of Dreams, however, Freud makes several remarks about secondary revision (sekundare Bearbeitung) that are of great interest to a reading of the Olympica.
Another metaphor resonant with Cartesian overtones which Freud employs to describe secondary revision is that of "building up a facade for the dream" V- 491).
Descartes' philosophical project, couched in the same terms as Freud's description of secondary revision, is to reconstruct the edifice of philosophy.
Freud compares secondary revision to a technique used by humorists in the Viennese newspaper, the Fliegende Blatter.
Thus philosophy, like secondary revision, is at work in Descartes' text as the imposition of Latin inscriptions upon a palimpsest of confused words and images in French.
It is our contention that these dreamed books provide the patches and inscriptions, the facades, with which Descartes will construct the secondary revision of the three dreams and his philosophy.
By citing only the title of Ausonius' poem in the dream and interpreting it to mean the discernment of Truth and Falsehood which God had granted him, Descartes performs, literally, the operation which Freud equates with secondary revision and philosophy: the patching up of the gaps in the structures of the universe.
By interpreting his own dreams, by imposing a secondary revision on them, he vanquished confusion and doubt and found a truth so convincing and coherent that it could only have been sent by God.
By simultaneously furnishing the physical evidence that it wasn't just a dream yet continuing further and making the question of dreaming or wakefulness irrelevant to the truth value of the Cogito, Descartes is offering the reader a writing which is both tangible yet the record of an event which could have been, and on some level is desired to be, in the language of secondary revision (and philosophy), "just a dream.