Seebeck effect


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Related to Seebeck effect: Thomson effect, Peltier effect, Seebeck coefficient, Thermoelectric generator

Seebeck effect:

see thermoelectricitythermoelectricity,
direct conversion of heat into electric energy, or vice versa. The term is generally restricted to the irreversible conversion of electricity into heat described by the English physicist James P.
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Seebeck effect

The generation of a temperature-dependent electromotive force (emf) at the junction of two dissimilar metals. This phenomenon provides the physical basis for the thermocouple. In 1821, T. J. Seebeck discovered that near a closed circuit composed of two linear conductors of two different metals a magnetic needle would be deflected if, and only if, the two junctions were at different temperatures, and that if the temperatures of the two junctions were reversed the direction of deflection would also be reversed. He investigated 35 different metals and arranged them in a series such that at a hot junction, current flows from a metal earlier in the series to a later one. See Electromotive force (emf)

A thermocouple consists of a pair of wires of dissimilar metals, joined at the ends. One junction is kept at an accurately known cold temperature, usually that of melting ice, and the other is used for the measurement of an unknown temperature, by measuring the emf generated as a result of the Seebeck effect. See Thermocouple, Thermoelectricity

Seebeck effect

[′zā‚bek i‚fekt]
(electronics)
The development of a voltage due to differences in temperature between two junctions of dissimilar metals in the same circuit.
(graphic arts)
A photographic emulsion that is exposed until a faint visible image appears, and is then exposed to colored light and takes on the color of the light to which it is exposed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pain said the boot uses the Seebeck effect, named after physicist Thomas Johann Seebeck, in which a circuit of two dissimilar metals conducts electricity if the two places where they connect are held at different temperatures.
While many semiconductor materials can produce an electric potential when heated through something called the Seebeck effect, that effect is very weak in carbon.
The thermoelectric effect or thermoelectricity encompasses three separately identified effects: the Seebeck effect, the Peltier effect and the Thomson effect.
The Seebeck effect was discovered by Thomas Seebeck in 1821.
company cofounded by Wright, uses energy scavengers that take advantage of the Seebeck effect, in which certain metals develop voltages when one end is hotter than the other.
Thermal sensors utilize the Seebeck effect in which thermoelectric force is generated due to the temperature difference at the contact points between two different kinds of metal.
Thermoelectric generation is technology designed to generate electric power from heat by taking advantage of the Seebeck effect which converts temperature differences of metals or semiconductors to electric voltage.