Seebeck effect


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Seebeck effect:

see thermoelectricitythermoelectricity,
direct conversion of heat into electric energy, or vice versa. The term is generally restricted to the irreversible conversion of electricity into heat described by the English physicist James P.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Seebeck effect

The generation of a temperature-dependent electromotive force (emf) at the junction of two dissimilar metals. This phenomenon provides the physical basis for the thermocouple. In 1821, T. J. Seebeck discovered that near a closed circuit composed of two linear conductors of two different metals a magnetic needle would be deflected if, and only if, the two junctions were at different temperatures, and that if the temperatures of the two junctions were reversed the direction of deflection would also be reversed. He investigated 35 different metals and arranged them in a series such that at a hot junction, current flows from a metal earlier in the series to a later one. See Electromotive force (emf)

A thermocouple consists of a pair of wires of dissimilar metals, joined at the ends. One junction is kept at an accurately known cold temperature, usually that of melting ice, and the other is used for the measurement of an unknown temperature, by measuring the emf generated as a result of the Seebeck effect. See Thermocouple, Thermoelectricity

Seebeck effect

[′zā‚bek i‚fekt]
(electronics)
The development of a voltage due to differences in temperature between two junctions of dissimilar metals in the same circuit.
(graphic arts)
A photographic emulsion that is exposed until a faint visible image appears, and is then exposed to colored light and takes on the color of the light to which it is exposed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Peltier and Seebeck effects are reversals of one another.
The Seebeck effect has been used by NASA to supply power for deep space probes in its radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and is of current interest to automobile manufacturers to supply additional power through waste heat recovery.
TEGs use the Seebeck effect to directly develop an output voltage when a sufficiently large temperature difference exists across their elements.
The Seebeck Effect just made it to outer space, powering satellites from the heat produced by small nuclear reactors.
Thomas Johann Seebeck is usually referred to as the discoverer of one of the basic thermoelectric effects, the Seebeck effect.
Nextreme's thin-film embedded thermoelectric generator (eTEG[TM]) generates electricity via the Seebeck effect, where electricity is produced from a temperature differential applied across the device.
Thermoelectric generation is technology designed to generate electric power from heat by taking advantage of the Seebeck effect which converts temperature differences of metals or semiconductors to electric voltage.
Suitable for demonstrating the Seebeck effect, Tellurex's PG-1 thermoelectric power generation experimentation kit supplies a net output of -0.
Seebeck Effect The generation of a voltage in a circuit in which there are junctions between dissimilar metals at different temperatures.
A nanoengineered thin-film embedded thermoelectric generator (eTEG) generates electrical power (greater than that of one using conventional materials) via the Seebeck effect, where electricity is produced from a temperature differential applied across the device.