seed pod


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seed pod

a carpel or pistil enclosing the seeds of a plant, esp a flowering plant
References in periodicals archive ?
One clue came from the observation that Arabidopsis plants--which belong to the Brassicaceae (mustard or cabbage) family--mature and open their seed pods faster when grown at elevated temperatures, according to the study.
A regression analysis showed the number of mature seeds contained within a pod is weakly positively correlated with seed pod length ([R.
Optimum condition for producing activated carbon (AC3) from Moringa oleifera seed pod was activated at 800degC using ZnCl2 as activating agent resulting BET surface area 853.
I've been paying attention to elements in the woods such as seed pods, buds, moss, grasses, leaves, sticks and stones.
The seed pod would then go on top to cover the "inner workings" of my key hanger.
Botanically speaking, there are at least two distinct groups of martynias: the Ibicellae with thorny seed pods and the Proboscidea with smooth seed pods.
When mature, the seed pod will explode at the slightest touch.
Which country has a parliament called the seed pod of a tree-climbing orchid?
Which food flavouring is produced from the seed pod of a tree-climbing orchid?
The rhythm of the dancers, accentuated by ``chacoyote'' seed pod anklets blends with the beat of the drum resulting in a vibrant, dazzling spectacle.
Which food flavouring comes from the seed pod of the Mexican orchid?
In order to get good pollination, fertilisation and the resultant seed pod, the flowers have to be hand pollinated, each worker pollinating about 1,000 flowers per day - now you know why a vanilla pod is so expensive