Sei Shonagon

Sei Shonagon

(sĕē shō`nä`gōn), c.966?-?, Japanese poet and essayist of the mid-Heian period. She is best known for her Makura no sôshi [pillow book], a collection of anecdotes, reflections, aesthetic assessments, and anecdotes of court life, written from her experiences serving at the court of the empress Teishi. The more than three hundred entries provide invaluable insight into contemporary court ceremony, intrigues, and politics. In addition to its historic interest, the Makura no sôshi is a literary masterpiece, displaying a sharp wit, deft expression, and spontaneity. After the death of her patroness, Sei Shonagon left the court and married a provincial governor, becoming a Buddhist nun upon his death.
References in periodicals archive ?
The two author-protagonists, the narrator, Jane Takagi-Little, and her Japanese counterpart, Akiko Ueno, define themselves in relation to a third author, Sei Shonagon, and her tenth-century miscellany text known as The Pillow Book.
A monument inside the Sennyu-ji Temple is dedicated to Sei Shonagon, the author of Pillow Book, about her time as a court lady to Empress Consort Teishi in the early eleventh century.
Ceir cyfieithiad o waith erchwyn gwely Sei Shonagon, darn wedi ei gyfieithu gan Gillian Clark (wrth gwrs) ac adolygiadau o lyfrau Saesneg Cynan Jones a Lloyd Jones, ynghyd a chyfieithiad o gerdd gan Rhian Edwards.
I learned about lists from Ivan Morris's translation of The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon where readers see how a mere list can be elegant writing.
The Pillow Book by Sei Shonagon, Empress Sadako's lady in waiting from about 993-1000, offers rich detail about the meaning and power of dress during the Heian period [794-1185].
She begins with Sei Shonagon, a lady-in-waiting in the tenth century Japanese court.
Sei Shonagon, a servant to the Japanese Empress Sadako 1,000 years ago, wrote a single volume, The Pillow Book, that is difficult to classify.
Also Jeffrey Deitch and Mariko Mori, the latter swaddled in very spiritual, snow-on-plum-blossoms white (something Sei Shonagon mentions in her list of "Elegant Things" in the Heian-era Pillow Book).
Heian era women of letters, Sei Shonagon and Murasaki Shikibu, were slated for Valentine's Day, and a multilingual Santa Claus who sounds a bit like Darth Vader came out at Christmas.
and the Japan Acoustic Laboratory jointly said Friday they have started offering a cell phone service in which historical figures such as Mona Lisa and Sei Shonagon, the 10th-century author of ''The Pillow Book,'' offer advice to subscribers.
Based on the works of 11thcentury Japanese poet Sei Shonagon, the story harks back to a time when women were not supposed to show any feelings, sexual or otherwise.
Should I have to recommend a few pages to young people desirous of moving discoveries, I would recommend the poems of Sei Shonagon or Emily Dickinson.