Seigniory


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Seigniory

 

(also seigneury), a term used in the historical literature to denote a complex of feudal landholdings and the right to authority over the feudally dependent peasants living on those lands; applied primarily to Western European countries. In this broad sense, “seigniory” is synonymous with votchina (Russian patrimonial estate). In a narrower sense, “seigniory” means a type of patrimonial estate on which the lord made little or no effort to organize the cultivation of demesne lands; all or almost all of the land of such a seigniory was held by dependent peasant tenants, who paid the lord quitrent in money or in kind.

References in periodicals archive ?
6) This paper will use the spelling of "seigneurial," although Scott titles his story "The Tragedy of the Seigniory," because the former is the more common usage of spelling in the historical documents I have employed.
Kristmanson would likely admit that his Gouzenko hypothesis is far from empirically proven (a vanisbing guest book from the Seigniory Club in Montebello and an allegedly symbolic reference to Lord Beaverbrook's chickens in a letter from Churchill to his wife seem to be the flimsiest points), but such speculation has polemical value.
better than a just and lawful seigniory," makes "his will and comaundment a lawe vnto his owne vassall," whom he treats as "a very slave and villein.
We had left Concord Wednesday morning, and we endeavored to realize that now, Friday morning, we were taking a walk in Canada, in the Seigniory of Beauport, a foreign country, which a few days before had seemed almost as far off as England and France.
Nicole Poulin, Secretary of La Societe de Restauration du Patrimoine Sir John Johnson, was the guest speaker, She had a great deal of information about Sir John's life while he owned the Seigniory of Monnoir.