selection bias

(redirected from Selection effect)

selection bias

[si′lek·shən ‚bī·əs]
(statistics)
A bias built into an experiment by the method used to select the subjects which are to undergo treatment.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, There is no simple and poor relations among phenotypic, genetic and environmental correlation coefficient, so the ideal selection effect cannot be obtained only base on genetic correlation relationship selection in the breeding (Jin et al.
In other words, a selection effect swamped the scarring effect that they sought to identify.
A party selection effect that involves selection into
It could be evidence of selection effect that could reduce additive variation and subsequently could reduce phenotypic variation.
For example, "popular software programs can run attributions over custom periods to tell us that our manager added x basis points of stock selection effect in the technology sector," West and Ko write.
The explanation relies on a selection effect associated with changes in the marriage rate and on racial differences in access to human capital investment opportunities.
One shortcoming with this approach is, while it addresses the selection effect by differentiating freshmen from upperclass students, it does not deal with the endogenous decision to study economics for each individual.
Now, to be sure, that's very hard research to do, in part because of the selection effect.
Using the passage of the Act to identify the selection effect we find that individuals who would have chosen to enter the credit card market early in the absence of the Act are less likely to experience serious delinquency or default than the individuals who enter the credit card market later," the researchers wrote.
The within-plant productivity gains reflect efficiency gains in addition to the typically documented selection effect.
The selection effect is a causal relationship running from health care utilization to health insurance, whereas both the direct price effect and the indirect insurance effect that discourage healthy behavior are causalities running from health insurance to medical utilization.
The empirical findings highlight a new selection effect that has important implications for the welfare consequences of measured price rigidity.