Self-Motion


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Self-Motion

 

(or self-movement), an internal, necessary, and spontaneous change of a system that is determined by the system’s contradictions, which mediate the action of external factors and conditions. In dialectical materialism, the idea of self-motion is based on the premise that internal causes are the source of self-motion. These internal causes are, first of all, the contradictions inherent in all objects with a systemic structure. Other forces can also serve as causes; an example is the interaction of individual components of the system. The influence of external conditions on a specific self-moving system is indirect, through internal sources.

Self-motion that exhibits direction and irreversible change is a special type of self-motion called self-development. Here the idea of self-motion merges with the dialectical conception of development. In this conception, “the chief attention is directed precisely to knowledge of the source of ’self -movement” (V. I. Lenin, Poln. sobr. sock, 5th ed., vol. 29, p. 317).

References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the source of all motion is self-motion, or soul.
The perception of self-motion can also be induced by auditory or visual cues without vestibular stimulation, such as in cases of rest and constant velocity [41-42].
Visual-vestibular interaction: Effects on self-motion perception and postural control.
In this passage Aristotle states that in the strict sense of 'locomotion' the self-motion of an animal (e.
Bearing in mind this notion of the philosophically acceptable variety of self-motion, two of Genequand's translations are unsettling.
The notion of the soul as a self-moving entity is found fatuously in Plato's Phaedrus, his Laws, and in other places;(57) but Ficino's attribution to Pythagoras of a coupling of the soul's propensity for self-motion with circular motion is puzzling.
Indeed, with full-field immersive stimulus motion, there is a powerful illusion of self-motion (vection) and the stimulus is perceived as stationary.
These local activities within the individual neurites represent self-motion signals and control movement.
They depend upon the premise that life is self-motion, the Aristotelian definition which Descartes learned from Latin handbooks at La Fleche.
Mid-seventeenth-century concerns regarding agency and organization enabled the vitalistic philosophy of self-motion to provide a discourse for nonhierarchical and inclusive political association.
The discovery may eventually lead to new therapies for people with Alzheimer's disease and other disorders that impair a person's sense of self-motion, noted DeAngelis.