Self-Motion


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Self-Motion

 

(or self-movement), an internal, necessary, and spontaneous change of a system that is determined by the system’s contradictions, which mediate the action of external factors and conditions. In dialectical materialism, the idea of self-motion is based on the premise that internal causes are the source of self-motion. These internal causes are, first of all, the contradictions inherent in all objects with a systemic structure. Other forces can also serve as causes; an example is the interaction of individual components of the system. The influence of external conditions on a specific self-moving system is indirect, through internal sources.

Self-motion that exhibits direction and irreversible change is a special type of self-motion called self-development. Here the idea of self-motion merges with the dialectical conception of development. In this conception, “the chief attention is directed precisely to knowledge of the source of ’self -movement” (V. I. Lenin, Poln. sobr. sock, 5th ed., vol. 29, p. 317).

References in periodicals archive ?
81) Thus Gassendi's 1641 treatment of passages in which Descartes denies that the human soul is the cause of the body's self-motion (life) focuses on bodily movements, and it is vague about any other sort of motion a soul would cause besides locomotion or thought.
Aristotle therefore recognizes the intentionality of objects of desire and thought, but he does not allow that objects whose existence is merely intentional can provide a full explanation of animal self-motion.
The reason for this separation is that the sense of self-motion induced by scene movement caused by a correct head-turning response is a perception of real motion and not vection.
One of the central challenges facing Giles was how to reconcile the act-potency axiom with the self-motion of the will.
Applications of this theory to VEs often focus on mismatches involving visual and vestibular cues to self-motion.
Vision provides important information for perceiving and controlling one's own motion within a fixed environment (see Warren, 1990, for an overview of visual self-motion perception).
Few concepts are more central to Aristotle's understanding of the cosmos than self-motion and few are more difficult to grasp.
Both regularly express reflective or self-motion with either the passive voice with an agent, that is, a thing is moved by itself, or the active with a reflexive, that is, a thing moves itself by itself.
Plato then proceeds to give the name of soul to this self-motion (which is literally defined as ten dunamenin auten hauten kinein kinesin, or as to heauto kinein, 896a), and to refer secondary motions to "the motion of an inanimate body" (somatos apsuchou metabole) (896b).
The final essay is Mary Louise Gill's "Aristotle on Self-Motion.
We probe sensorimotor strategies of normal and impaired systems, by quantifying their acquisition of priors about the (changing) environment, and use of feedback about active or passive-induced self-motion of eyes and head.