plaque

(redirected from Senile plaques)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

plaque

1. Pathol any small abnormal patch on or within the body, such as the typical lesion of psoriasis
2. short for dental plaque

Plaque

A tablet, often inscribed, added to or set into a surface on the exterior or interior wall.

plaque

[plak]
(medicine)
A patch, or an abnormal flat area on any internal or external body surface.
A localized area of atherosclerosis.
(virology)
A clear area representing a colony of viruses on a plate culture formed by lysis of the host cell.

plaque

A tablet that is affixed to the surface of a wall or set into a wall; often inscribed to commemorate a special event or to serve as a memorial.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of AD many authors speculate that senile plaques and NFTs constitute the site of activation of a chronic inflammatory response.
18) This stain will highlight senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles as well as many of the lesions seen in other neurodegenerative diseases.
Studies in mice have shown that memory loss correlates more strongly with the presence of ADDLs than with the presence of senile plaques, and that treatments to reduce ADDL levels can actually reverse memory loss.
It is characterized by the gradual buildup of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain that occurs years before clinical symptoms appear.
The appearance of microglia in senile plaques is a late event in DS, and it coincides with the development of neuritic changes in A[Beta] plaques and of NFTs.
In 1984, researchers discovered that these senile plaques consist of a central core of beta amyloid protein, surrounded by a cluster of abnormal nerve cells clogged with twisted fibers called neurofibrillary tangles.
Nonetheless, because the incidence of both CAA and Alzheimer's disease increase strikingly with age, and because the senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease both contain amyloid, researchers have wondered whether there might be more than a casual relationship between amyloid deposition and the development of dementia in Alzheimer's disease.
Accumulations of beta-amyloid are believed to form senile plaques and cause brain cell death.
The autopsy results showed two abnormal pathological changes: neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and senile plaques (SPs).
In 1907, Alois Alzheimer was the first to report a case of intellectual deterioration with the histological findings of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles [1].
It may also inhibit senile plaques from depositing in the brain, which impairs cognition.
Microglial cells, the nervous system's defenders, are unable to eliminate this substance, which forms deposits called senile plaques.