senior

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senior

1. Education
a. of, relating to, or designating more advanced or older pupils
b. of or relating to a secondary school
2. 
a. a senior pupil, student, etc.
b. a fellow of senior rank in an English university
References in classic literature ?
At this solemn indictment the novice raised his hand and twitched his lip, while even the placid senior brothers glanced across at each other and coughed to cover their amusement.
Two months passed, and the Senior Subaltern still educated The Worm, who began to move about a little more as the hot weather came on.
The Senior Subaltern was so pleased with getting his Company and his acceptance at the same time that he forgot to bother The Worm.
He had formed his own opinion from the papers entrusted to him, and did not especially want to go into the matter with his senior partner.
Letterblair looked at him from under enquiring eyebrows, and the young man, aware of the uselessness of trying to explain what was in his mind, bowed acquiescently while his senior continued: "Divorce is always unpleasant.
I thought I was well acquainted with the various methods by which a gentleman can throw away his money," the senior partner remarked.
He was ten years my senior both in years and service, and I rather think he could never forget the fact that he had been an officer when I was a green apprentice.
Ablewhite, senior, himself) for a loan of three hundred pounds.
Ablewhite, senior, refused to lend his son a farthing.
He's the very man," declared the senior, without a moment's hesitation.
We had better be going together over the ship, Captain," said the senior partner; and the three men started to view the perfections of the Nan-Shan from stem to stern, and from her keelson to the trucks of her two stumpy pole-masts.
Weller, senior, with much solemnity in his manner; 'there never was a nicer woman as a widder, than that 'ere second wentur o' mine--a sweet creetur she was, Sammy; all I can say on her now, is, that as she was such an uncommon pleasant widder, it's a great pity she ever changed her condition.