Sepioidea

Sepioidea

[‚sē·pē′ȯid·ē·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)
An order of the molluscan subclass Coleoidea having a well-developed eye, an internal shell, fins separated posteriorly, and chromatophores in the dermis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each egg is individually enveloped in Sepioidea, whereas batches of eggs are encompassed within a sheet of nidamental gland jelly in most Teuthoidea (Natsukari 1970, O'Dor 1983, Okutani 1983, Segawa 1987, von Boletzky 1989).
Hanlon, 1998), Sepioteuthis australis Quoy & Gaimard, 1832 (Jantzen and Havenhand, 2003), and Sepioteuthis sepioidea (Blainville, 1823) (Arnold, 1965).
Ultrastructure of the optic gland of the squid Sepiotheutis sepioidea (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae).
A second mechanism is interspecific defense, based on the use of aversive, distasteful chemicals, as shown for ink of Caribbean reef squid Sepioteuthis sepioidea against a predatory fish, the French grunt Haemulon flavolineaum (Wood et al.
Replinger & Wood (2007) have used this tagging technology with the Caribbean reef squid, Sepioteuthis sepioidea, demonstrating its potential for cephalopods.
In this study the fine ultrastructure of the tropical squid Sepiotheutis sepioidea (Blainville, 1823) (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae) was examined in both sexes at different sexual maturity stages, using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) in order to compare secretory cell changes during the life cycle of this specie.
Alternatively, because two cuttlefish were present during trials with seabass compared to one with bluefish, the Dark eye ring display may have been used as a signal to conspecifics to alert them of danger as well as an antipredator display, as has been suggested for Sepioteuthis sepioidea by Moynihan and Rodaniche (1982).
According to Voss (1977), the Sepioidea includes Spirulidae, Sepiidae, Sepiolidae, Idiosepiidae, and Sepiadariidae.
Ink is a conspecific alarm cue in the reef squid Sepioteuthis sepioidea.
2009); squid Sepioteuthis sepioidea parrotfish mimicry in an apparent attempt to get closer to small fishes that they were preying upon (Hanlon and Messenger, 1996).
The behavior and natural history of the Caribbean Reef Squid Sepioteuthis sepioidea, with a consideration of social, signal and defensive patterns for difficult and dangerous environments.