Seven-Year School

Seven-Year School

 

in the USSR, an incomplete secondary general-education school originating in 1921 and existing until the 1950’s.

During the 1920’s some of the urban seven-year schools were called industrial training seven-year schools; the rural seven-year schools were called schools for peasant youth and, later, schools for kolkhoz youth. In 1934, in accordance with the decree of the Central Committee of the ACP(B) and the Council of People’s Commissars of the USSR On the Structure of Primary and Secondary Schools in the USSR, three types of general-education schools were established: primary (grades 1–4). incomplete secondary (grades 1–7), and secondary (grades 1–10). Pupils graduating from a seven-year school could continue their education at a secondary general-education school or at specialized secondary or vocational-training institutions. When a system of universal compulsory eight-year education was introduced in 1958, the seven-year school became an eight-year school and part of the secondary general education school.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sophomore Alyssa Jasper broke a seven-year school record in winning the javelin (147-4), the third-best toss in the NCAA Division 3 this season.
Finally, it would add $100 million to the existing seven-year school asbestos-hazard-abatement loan program, new funded at $600 million; loans repaid to the federal government would be entered into a new "trust fund' from which additional school loans could be issued.
Former seven-year school committee member Pamela Caranfa spoke strongly against the two articles, saying that designating Royalston kindergarten through Grade 6 could cost the district up to $1 million.