Seward


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Related to Seward: seaward, Seward's Folly, Hubbard Glacier

Seward,

city (1990 pop. 2,699), Kenai Peninsula borough, S Alaska, on Kenai Peninsula, at the head of Resurrection Bay; inc. 1912. It was founded in 1902 as the ocean terminus of the Alaska RR (built 1915–23). Its airfield and ice-free harbor make it an important shipping and supply center for the Alaskan interior. It is a coal terminal and cargo port, and there is fishing, lumbering, and seafood canning and freezing. Tourism also bolsters the city's economy. Seward was almost completely devastated by an earthquake in 1964 but has since been rebuilt. In the city are a Univ. of Alaska maritime research station and a ranger office for Chugach National Forest. An annual salmon derby is held, and a race up nearby Mt. Marathon every July 4th attracts athletes from a wide area.

Seward

 

a city on the southern coast of Alaska (USA), on the Kenai Peninsula. Population, 1,600 (1970). A commercial and transportation junction, Seward is a seaport, which handled about 150,000 tons of freight in 1971. It is also the terminus of the railroad line to Fairbanks, with which it is also linked by highway. The main industries are fishing and the processing of fish, mainly salmon and crab.


Seward

 

a peninsula in western Alaska, between Norton Sound in the south and Kotzebue Sound in the north. Seward Peninsula rises to a maximum elevation of 1,437 m. It has gold deposits. The port of Nome is situated on the southern coast.

Seward

William Henry. 1801--72, US statesman; secretary of state (1861--69). He was a leading opponent of slavery and was responsible for the purchase of Alaska (1867)
References in periodicals archive ?
Seward is the southern terminus of the Alaska Railroad, which earlier this year released a wide-ranging master plan for improvements and additions to its facilities.
Mr Seward said: "If we don't do this up-skilling, it means we have to bring people, who have this competence from other areas like Bristol, London, and the Midlands, into Wales to complete this work.
Instead of treating Seward as "a victim" (26) as in her first chapter on the poet's fall from critical grace, "Under Suspicious Circumstances," Kairoff might have benefited from considering how other neoclassical poets of the Romantic period (Samuel Rogers, Thomas Campbell, among others) have likewise been critically disappeared, and from considering in broader terms the era's controversies over neoclassical poetics.
However, Seward insists that Harry's antics are just part of his personality.
It's reassuring to learn that these businesses, which are undoubtedly vital to our economic recovery, have been able to deal with the change," said Mr Seward.
Further, Seward cited instances last spring where Journalism On-line's Steven Brill (along with Gordon Crovitz and Leo Hindrey, one of the company's co-founders) talked about the need to only get "five or 10 percent of your most committed readers to pay.
Managing Director for Skanem UK, Steve Dunne says: 'Peter Seward brings a whole array of experience to our Newcastle operation.
The foundation has had pounds 892 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Swan of Lichfield, the 18th century poet Anna Seward, with an exhibition in the spring.
In gaining the Republican nomination for President, Lincoln had upset three better-known candidates: Senator William Seward of New York, Ohio Governor Salmon P.
Jane Seward suggested during a presentation at the joint annual meeting of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
Seward, exhausted and ready for retirement, was a far cry from the vigorous, ambitious man of 1860, who had confidently expected to be president of the United States.