Seward


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Seward,

city (1990 pop. 2,699), Kenai Peninsula borough, S Alaska, on Kenai Peninsula, at the head of Resurrection Bay; inc. 1912. It was founded in 1902 as the ocean terminus of the Alaska RR (built 1915–23). Its airfield and ice-free harbor make it an important shipping and supply center for the Alaskan interior. It is a coal terminal and cargo port, and there is fishing, lumbering, and seafood canning and freezing. Tourism also bolsters the city's economy. Seward was almost completely devastated by an earthquake in 1964 but has since been rebuilt. In the city are a Univ. of Alaska maritime research station and a ranger office for Chugach National Forest. An annual salmon derby is held, and a race up nearby Mt. Marathon every July 4th attracts athletes from a wide area.

Seward

 

a city on the southern coast of Alaska (USA), on the Kenai Peninsula. Population, 1,600 (1970). A commercial and transportation junction, Seward is a seaport, which handled about 150,000 tons of freight in 1971. It is also the terminus of the railroad line to Fairbanks, with which it is also linked by highway. The main industries are fishing and the processing of fish, mainly salmon and crab.


Seward

 

a peninsula in western Alaska, between Norton Sound in the south and Kotzebue Sound in the north. Seward Peninsula rises to a maximum elevation of 1,437 m. It has gold deposits. The port of Nome is situated on the southern coast.

Seward

William Henry. 1801--72, US statesman; secretary of state (1861--69). He was a leading opponent of slavery and was responsible for the purchase of Alaska (1867)
References in periodicals archive ?
Barbecue ribs, brisket, smoked chicken, macaroni and cheese, and baked beans are among the specialty items expected to be served out of the caboose, Seward said, noting local residents have given the food high praise.
Al-Fageeh said: "The council is fortunate to have an exceptionally talented group of visionary executive leaders, and we are particularly pleased with the committee's election of our colleague Seward as our next chair.
While the administration works to solve the crisis, Seward would be one of the few cities in the United States where people would have the rare opportunity to experience the much-awaited solar eclipse in full on Monday at 2.
Seward Highway MP 75-90: Ingram Creek to Girdwood Road and Bridge Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of the highway including passing lanes and parking accommodations MP 81-90 and construction of three replacement bridges within this segment at Glacier Creek (bridge #639), Virgin Creek (bridge #638), and Petersen Creek (bridge #636).
In 2016, the current definition could limit access to the stop-loss market to employers with more than 100 employees, according to Seward and Cahill say.
Perhaps the most useful aspect of this sympathetic biography derives from the information it provides on why Seward and Lincoln developed such a close relationship.
Part of that strategy, Mr Seward explained, was to decide where to locate the business in the UK.
Kairoff repeatedly finds Seward "anticipating" (3, 6, 7, 8, etc.
I think that's what people love about Harry," Seward said.
Whereas Seward draws on a few of the eminent Josephus scholars of our day, he did his own spade work.
Seward will help oversee the AP News Center in New York City.