Lust

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Lust

Aeshma
fiend of evil passion. [Iranian Myth.: Leach, 17]
Aholah and Aholibah
lusty whores; bedded from Egypt to Babylon. [O.T.: Ezekiel 23:1–21]
Alcina
lustful fairy. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]
Ambrosio, Father
supposedly virtuous monk goatishly ravishes maiden. [Br. Lit.: The Monk]
Angelo
asked by Isabella to cancel her brother’s death sentence, Angelo agrees if she will yield herself to him. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare Measure for Measure]
Aphrodite Porne
patron of lust and prostitution. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 16]
Armida’s Garden
symbol of the attractions of the senses. [Ital. Lit.: Jerusalem Delivered]
Aselges
personification of lasciviousness. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 67]
Ashtoreth
goddess of sexual love. [Phoenician Myth.: Zimmer-man, 32]
Asmodeus
female spirit of lust. [Jew. Myth.: Jobes, 141]
Balthazar B
shy gentleman afloat on sea of lasciviousness. [Am. Lit.: The Beastly Beatitudes of Balthazar B]
Belial
demon of libidinousness and falsehood. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Bess
Porgy’s “temporary” woman; she knew weakness of her will and flesh. [Am. Lit.: Porgy, Magill I, 764–766; Am. Opera: Gershwin, Porgy and Bess]
Brothers Karamazov, The
family given to the pleasures of flesh. [Russ. Lit.: The Brothers Karamazov]
Caro
loathsome hag; personification of fleshly lust. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 180]
Casanova
(1725–1798) loving (and likable) libertine. [Ital. Hist.: Espy, 130]
Cleopatra
(69–30 B.C.) Egyptian queen, used sex for power. [Egyptian Hist.: Wallechinsky, 323]
Don Juan
literature’s most active seducer: “in Spain, 1003.” [Span. Lit.: Benét, 279; Ger. Opera: Mozart, Don Giovanni, Espy, 130–131]
elders of Babylon
condemn Susanna when carnal passion goes unrequited. [Apocrypha: Daniel and Susanna]
Falstaff, Sir John
fancies himself a lady-killer. [Br. Lit.: Merry Wives of Windsor]
Fritz the Cat
a tomcat in every sense. [Comics: Horn, 266–267]
goat
lust incarnate. [Art: Hall, 139]
hare
attribute of sexual desire incarnate. [Art: Hall, 144]
horns
attribute of Pan and the satyr; symbolically, lust. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 190; Art: Hall, 157]
Hartman, Rev. Curtis
lusts after a young woman viewed at her window, but turns the experience into a hysterical sense of redemption. [Am. Lit.: Winesburg, Ohio]
John of the Funnels, Friar
monk advocating lust. [Fr. Lit.: Gargantua and Pantagruel]
Lilith
sensual female; mythical first wife of Adam. [O.T.: Genesis 4:16]
long ears
symbol of licentiousness. [Indian Myth.: Leach, 333]
Lothario
heartless libertine and active seducer. [Br. Lit.: Fair Penitent, Espy, 129]
Malecasta
personification of wantonness. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
Montez, Lola
(1818–1861) beguiling mistress to the eminent. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 325]
Obidicut
fiend; provokes men to gratify their lust. [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
Pan
man-goat of bawdy and lecherous ways. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 798]
Paphnutius
monk converts a courtesan but cannot overcome his lust for her. [Fr. Lit.: Anatole France Thaïs in Benét, 997]
pig
attribute of lust personified. [Art: Hall, 247]
Porneius
personification of fornication. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 865]
Priapus
monstrous genitals led him on the wayward path. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 252]
Ridgeon, Sir Colenso
refrains from using his tuberculosis cure to save the life of a man whose wife he coveted. [Br. Lit.: Shaw The Doctor’s Dilemma in Sobel, 173]
Robinson, Mrs.
middle-aged lady lusts after young graduate. [Am. Lit.: The Graduate; Am. Music: “Mrs. Robinson”]
Salome
in her provocative Dance of the Seven Veils. [Aust. Opera: R. Strauss, Salome, Westerman, 417]
Spanish
jasmine flower symbolizing lust. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Vathek
devotes his life to sexual and other sensuous indulgences. [Br. Lit.: Beckford Vathek]
Villiers, George
first Duke of Buckingham and libidinous dandy. [Br. Lit.: Waverley]
widow of Ephesus
weeping over her husband’s corpse, she is cheered by a compassionate sentry and they become ardent lovers in the burial vault. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]
Zeus
the many loves of this god have made his name a byword for sexual lust. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 297–301]
References in periodicals archive ?
Critics, however, prefer to categorize asexuality as a sexual dysfunction, such as hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), instead of as a sexual orientation.
Contrary to beliefs that a man seeing his partner in the throes of labour is a turn-off, the study found that women whose partners were in the delivery room reported stronger sexual desire post-birth.
These marriages, however, never take place, and, most noticeably in the description of Susan, the desire for her is "beyond the sea," rather than having actual romantic love or sexual desire exist in Narnia.
His dubious and rather imperialistic claim that other parts of the world now also display a similar "massive convergence" toward total body sex does not distract from the fact that any extrapolation about human sexual desire from such a limited population sample is suspect.
The key statistical question is whether the sexual desires of women in their early 30s significantly differ from the other age categories in ways that support or refute Hypotheses 1 and 2.
The tensions and creative interactions among sexual desire, creative production or "singing," and the temptations of social acceptance form the central conflict of much of "The Black Christ.
17) On the one hand, the discourse of foreplay allowed middle-class women to lay claim to sexual pleasure while maintaining their respectability - a possibility denied them throughout the nineteenth century - but only by constructing their sexual desire as latent and able to be evoked by a skilled husband.
Sexual desire is associated with several significant individual and interpersonal human life events.
Ironically, the only woman Mariah can turn to for help in getting the money necessary for delivering her baby in a hospital is Bannie Upshire Dudley, the white woman whose sexual desire for Mariah's father-in-law caused--or at least exacerbated--the town's economic hardship in the first place.
It is created by musicians to give voice to their buried desires, and jazz, in turn, awakens its listeners' buried desires, seen first as sexual desires and then as the desires that make Alice want to "squeeze the life out of [the world] for doing what it did .
Sex education curricula accept male adolescent sexual desire; however, girls are taught to recognize and resist the sexual desire of males, and not taught to acknowledge or recognize their own sexual desires (Tolman, 1994).
If the girls are not "ladies," then they must be "savages," and "savages" are not only rude and ill-mannered but driven by ungovernable sexual desires.