Sabbatai Zevi

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Sabbatai Zevi

(säbätī` zā`vē), 1626–76, Jewish mystic and pseudo-Messiah, founder of the Sabbatean sect, b. Smyrna. After a period of study of Lurianic kabbalah (see Luria, Isaac ben SolomonLuria or Loria, Isaac ben Solomon
, 1534–72, Jewish kabbalist, surnamed Ashkenazi, called Ari [lion] by his followers, b. Jerusalem. In his 20s he spent seven years in seclusion, intensely studying the kabbalah.
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), he became deeply influenced by its ideas of imminent national redemption. In 1648 he proclaimed himself the Messiah, named the year 1666 as the millennium, and gathered a host of followers. In 1666 he attempted to land in Constantinople, was captured, and to escape death embraced Islam. Nevertheless, the influence of the Sabbatean movement survived for many years; it had secret adherents in the 18th cent. and was revived under Jacob FrankFrank, Jacob,
c.1726–1791, Polish Jewish sectarian and adventurer, b. Podolia as Jacob Ben Judah Leib. He founded the Frankists, a heretical Jewish sect that was an anti-Talmudic outgrowth of the mysticism of the false Messiah Sabbatai Zevi.
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. The name is also spelled Shabbatai Zvi.

Bibliography

See G. G. Scholem, Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (3d rev. ed. 1954, repr. 1967), The Messianic Ideas in Judaism (tr. 1971), and Sabbatai Sevi, the Mystical Messiah (tr. 1973).

Sabbatai Zevi

false messiah, head of Kabbalic movement in mid-1600s. [Jew. Hist.: Wigoder, 544]
References in periodicals archive ?
61) Rabbi Eliezer Fleckeles of Prague (1754-1826) issued a rather fascinating responsum on the following topic: May one allow children to marry followers of the false messiahs Shabbatai Zevi and Jacob Frank?
And certain actual messianic movements, such as that of Shabbatai Zevi, seem to reveal the tragic-comic stakes of a strong messianic claim.
The doctrine of "redemption through sin" is usually identified with the seventeenth-century followers of the pseudo-messiah Shabbatai Zevi and with those eighteenth-century offspring of Shabbateanism, the Frankists.
Even their self-identification indicated such a connection: in contrast to other followers of Shabbatai Zevi, who simply called themselves ma'aminim [the faithful ones], his Polish followers called themselves the pious ones.
The prophecies of a messianic breakthrough appeared almost immediately after the fiasco of the prophecies about the return of Shabbatai Zevi from the beyond, scheduled for 1706.
A more factual explanation for these prophecies was given by Nehemia Hia Hayon, a prominent follower of Shabbatai Zevi.
Not that there weren't herem bans issued from time to time, such as famously on Jesus, Solomon Molcho, Shabbatai Zevi, and Baruch Spinoza, and, as we have seen, on the early Hasidim.
After the Chmielnicki holocaust (17) which some saw as the sacrifice of masses of Jewish lives as an act of atonement, Shabbatai Zevi declared himself to be the Jewish Messiah and a large Messianic sect followed him.