Sharecroppers


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Sharecroppers

 

tenant farmers, chiefly in the southern part of the USA, who work under the direction and supervision of the landowner or his agent. The plots of land held by the tenants are often part of large capitalist farms. Sharecroppers represent only the labor force; the land and the entire fixed and working capital belong to the landowner, who is also the owner of the final product. In accord with the contract, the landowner is to deliver part of the harvest to the sharecroppers.

References in periodicals archive ?
To control weeds, the sharecroppers line their paths with newspaper and then pile leaves on top of the newspaper.
Professor Moye convincly demonstrates how the civil rights movement was able to generate a successful challenge to the structures of slavery and sharecropper society in Sunflower County.
After the Civil War, sharecroppers became more prevalent and until the late 1950s sharecroppers using cotton mules produced most of the cotton grown in the South.
The Delta, as home to the biggest and richest plantations in the cotton belt, was the capital of the sharecropper system--at least in its most extreme form, in which all the sharecroppers were black and lived in self-contained plantation communities that were home, in many cases, to hundreds of people, and where the conditions were much closer to slavery than to normal employment.
Taken by Evans while he was employed by US President Franklin D Roosevelt's Resettlement (later Farm Security) Administration, the images were taken to draw the wider public's attention to the plight of the sharecroppers hard hit by the Depression and environmental factors, such as flooding, as well as demonstrate the positive work being done by the government agency.
Noguchi (1876-1928) was born to sharecroppers in a village in northern Japan, and rose to become first a skilled doctor, then a medical researcher in the US.
The first sharecroppers in the United States were slaves freed after the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) and at the end of the Civil War (1865).
Two years later he joined the Congress of Racial Equality and worked in Tennessee with sharecroppers who had been displaced for registering to vote.
On local plantations, sharecroppers worked long, punishing hours in all weather to raise the region's most important crop.
Whereas the subway riders lived their lives, literally and otherwise, in an environment of rapid change, the sharecroppers lived theirs in a condition of social and moral stasis that remained immune to change.
Historians have long cited the white populist revolt of the late nineteenth century that brought Southern white and black sharecroppers together as a powerful cross-racial movement.
In the last two weeks the show has delved into America's poorest region, where white men once got rich on the backs of their slaves and subsequently on the backs of their sharecroppers.