Sharecropping System


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Sharecropping System

 

(Russian, izdol’shchina), a type of land lease in which part of the harvest is paid to the landowner as rent. The sharecropping system on the whole characterizes precapitalist and underdeveloped capitalist forms of the exploitation of small agricultural producers. With regard to the origin of capitalist relations, the sharecropping system was a transitional form between the feudal and the capitalist land lease. It is still retained as a vestige of feudalism in some developed capitalist countries (the USA, Italy, Spain, and southwestern France). In many Oriental countries the sharecropping system is the chief form of tenant relations.

References in periodicals archive ?
Slow Food perceived these political and economic gaps in the Tuscan rural world since the disappearance of the sharecropping system and proposed itself as a management agency for goods and subjects.
In spite of a prosperous economy based on a profitable cotton industry, African Americans remained impoverished because of the legacy of slavery, the sharecropping system, and institutional racism.
whose life has been thwarted by the harsh sharecropping system, intimate
Lemann argued that contemporary black urban poverty is rooted in an "ethic of dependency" coming out of the southern sharecropping system.
The sharecropping system took root and with this system came presumptions of white blamelessness and of Black intellectual inferiority.
Thus "the federal government made further exploitation likely and the destruction of the tenancy and sharecropping system a relity.
Then, debt slavery--where the sharecropping system held many former slaves in legal bondage, forcing them to work to pay mythical debts to landowners, was common.
5) Under the post-abolition system of free labor, slave paternalism in agrarian production was transmogrified into the sharecropping system.
29) Peter Sluglett, who has been conducting research on Syrian landed notables prior to the agrarian reforms and who has had access to the financial records of one such family, notes that the sharecropping system provided peasants with "a vested interest in investing their labor on the estate," and that at least some landowners "invested considerable amounts in agriculture, particularly in canals, wells, irrigation pumps and agricultural machinery.
It focuses on the nature of the sharecropping system still dominant as land tenure in several parts of Sind.
The sharecropping system is the most obvious example of a totality of dominance over family and community life.
The sharecropping system allowed tenants to live on and work the land throughout the year and provided these working-class farmers with food and supplies on credit from the plantation commissary.