Shelter


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Shelter

 

(cover), a manmade structure or natural terrain feature, such as a mine, hillside, canyon, ravine, forest, or cave, used to protect military personnel and equipment from enemy fire and bad weather or to provide concealment. Shelters include pits, trenches, dugouts, equipment emplacements, various types of underground structures, and local residential, industrial, and administrative buildings. Cut-and-cover shelters consisting of a pit, one or two ramps for entry and exit, and breastworks are used to conceal combat equipment and vehicles.


Shelter

 

a specially constructed or equipped structure for the protection of military personnel and civilians from artillery shells, bombs, shock waves from atomic explosions, and toxic and radioactive substances. Shelters are classified as light, reinforced, or heavy, depending on the degree of protection afforded, and as small, medium-size, or large, depending on the capacity. Shelters were first used during World War I. Experience gained at that time was later widely used in building bomb shelters and gas shelters before World War II. Such shelters were built in the basements of residences and public buildings in all the major cities of Europe; they were also specially erected in a system of defensive positions during the construction of fortified areas and lines. During World War II, various types of shelter were used in combat to protect soldiers, staff, and medical facilities from artillery shells and bombs; in cities and smaller population centers, they were used to protect civilians.

References in classic literature ?
During the hour or two spent under the shelter of these bushes, I began to feel symptoms which I at once attributed to the exposure of the preceding night.
Reichard said the final ISO container for the Future Medical Shelter System likely will be an amalgam of the three prototypes.
Heat trapped within the shelter raises the temperature several degrees above the outside temperature, hence its name, Swelter Shelter (14).
Here again are those eerie photos of nattily dressed suburban families posing in model fallout shelters; the ineffable Herman Kahn thinking about the unthinkable; Bert the Turtle of "Duck and Cover" fame; the "Operation Alert" drills designed to spirit top federal officials out of Washington to secure locations; the impassioned debate over the morality of shooting one's neighbor at the shelter door, and much else.
ONE NATION UNDERGROUND: The Fallout Shelter in American Culture by Kenneth D.
The shelter was the idea of Duo-Gard's CEO/Founder AI Miller.
While engineers have tested such designs in laboratories, no aboveground shelter had ever passed a trial by tornado until this month, says Clifford Oliver of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), who surveyed the tornado damage last week.
The 100 per cent tax shelter stimulated production and the following two years saw a resurgence of feature filmmaking.
The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 broadened the definition of tax shelter to include any entity, investment, plan or arrangement with a "significant" purpose of avoiding (or evading) federal income tax.
Rather than provide normalization, it was intended to shelter the individual from normal frustrations, problems, and risks while allowing him to experience an attenuated form of normal task requirements on the job (e.
facility, which specializes in integrated shelter solutions for military, homeland security and disaster recovery applications.