shock front


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shock front

[′shäk ‚frənt]
(physics)
The outer side of a shock wave whose pressure rises from zero up to its peak value. Also known as pressure front.

shock front

shock frontclick for a larger image
shock frontclick for a larger image
i. A shock wave regarded as the forward surface of a fluid region having characteristics different from those of the region ahead of the wave.
ii. The front side of a shock wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
The speed of shock fronts exceeds the linear wave propagation but is less than the speed of the Riemann wave [1,26,30].
Also new is a coil-over shock front suspension, a revised rear suspension and a wider track width (three inches up front, one inch in back) for increased Stability.
But Howell's group spotted a delinquent la supernova, involving unusual chemicals and a slow shock front.
With the nonlinear Burgers equation and field data, procedures are developed to determine the sampler yield, the duration of inflow, the moving shock front or its velocity, as well as the storage of soil moisture readily available around the sphere of influence of the sink.
Whether the shock front passes from explosives material into air or from explosives material into a solid container wall, the shock wave will be partially reflected at the discontinuity (Davis 1998).
Nonetheless, the formation of a shock front also marks a limit on the amount of energy that can be pumped into a sound wave.
Dr Andy Breen, a solar-terrestrial physicist, said the shock front from the eruption was felt on Earth at 4am yesterday morning after being launched from the Sun about 11am the morning before.
At the time, theorists supposed that the matter in the supernova shock front was too thick for the gamma rays themselves to get out.
Nicknamed the Pencil Nebula due to its appearance in early photographs, NGC 2736 is a bright shock front from an ancient supernova.
Scientists want to understand how the acceleration of electrons in very strong shocks with large 'Mach numbers' depends on the angle between the magnetic field and a vector at right angles to the shock front.