Shop Costs

Shop Costs

 

(general shop outlays), the administrative and operating costs of a shop. Shop costs include the cost of maintaining the shop’s administrative and operational staff (basic and supplementary wages with deductions for social security), total amortization costs, and the cost of maintenance and current repair of the buildings, installations, and equipment that make up the shop’s fixed assets; the cost of testing, experimentation, and research, as well as of efficiency measures and inventions; expenditures on labor safety measures; the cost of wear, or deterioration, of inferior or rapidly deteriorating equipment and the amounts expended on its repair and restoration within the operational process; and miscellaneous costs, as well as certain nonproduction expenses.

Shop costs are part of the prime cost of the production (work and services) of a given shop; such costs are included in the prime cost of the respective manufactured items by means of a conventional system of apportionment. The order of apportionment of shop costs—both over costed items and between the unfinished and the finished product—is established by the rules of the appropriate branch of industry pertaining to the planning, accounting, and calculation of the prime cost of industrial production. Machine-building shop costs, as a rule, are apportioned among the individual types of products in proportion to the wages of production workers (not including bonus payments) plus the cost of equipment maintenance and operation; in the chemical industry, shop costs are apportioned in proportion to the total amount expended on processing, excluding the cost of raw materials and of semifinished goods produced by the shops themselves; and in textile production, in proportion to the number of loom-hours worked.

Certain itemized shop costs, which can be influenced by the shop unit, are included as part of the shops’ profit-and-loss accounting indicators for the purpose of monitoring the observance of shop cost estimates, identifying the possible means of reducing costs, and eliminating nonproduction expenses.

REFERENCES

Osnovnye polozheniia po planirovaniiu, uchetu i kal’kulirovaniiu sebestoimosti produktsii na promyshlennykh predpriiatiiakh. Moscow, 1970.
Bezrukikh, P. S. Uchet i kal’kulirovanie sebestoimosti produktsii. Moscow, 1974.
Kal’kuliatsiia sebestoimosti v promyshlennosti. Edited by A. M. Margulis. Moscow, 1975.

S. O. POLIAKOVA

References in periodicals archive ?
This is not just putting pressure on firms but also contributing to rising shop costs.
David Cameron, who is campaigning for a Remain vote, said: "If the pound falls, the prices in our shops go up, the weekly shop costs people more, family holiday costs more.
If the pound falls, then that means the prices in our shops go up, the weekly shop costs people more, that family holiday costs more.
A jewellers in London is launching a thousand pound shop for reduced-price jewels where everything in the shop costs PS1,000.
Gold Spender Occasional Shopper An average small family shop costs around PS26, which earns about PS13.
They're added up and once a total of 150 points has been Bronze Spender Occasional Shopper An average small family shop costs around PS26, which earns about PS13.
com, a leading auto body parts e-commerce website, is providing an alternative to expensive local body shop costs by offering painted auto body parts to consumers.
There are some unfortunate consequences of this as some large companies that did not embrace an online sales model have ceased trading and the emptiness of many shops in high streets around the country is partly due to the economic climate but also in some way due to the undeniable fact that running a shop costs money and if you can sell your goods effectively online without the cost of a shop why would you rent one?
Without the waiver, for which renters are charged an average of $I0 per day, liability for rents/car damage can approach tens of thousands of dollars because of today's escalating new car prices, body shop costs and the potential loss in profits to the rental company, warned PIA.
A secondary school uniform from a specialist shop costs on average pounds 64 for girls and pounds 55 for boys From a supermarket it would cost just pounds 30.
He is due to tell the Welsh Labour conference in Cardiff: "On current forecasts, the average worker will be earning the same in three years' time as they were ten years ago, but the weekly shop costs more, it costs a lot more to keep the house warm and we have a government that doesn't believe that its job is to stand up for ordinary people against powerful vested interests.
It is an established fact that a basket of groceries from the corner end shop costs more than at a supermarket.