Shor's algorithm


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Shor's algorithm

[¦shȯrz ′al·gə‚rith·əm]
(computer science)
An algorithm for factoring a large number within a reasonable amount of time, using a quantum computer.
References in periodicals archive ?
org/wiki/Shor%27s_algorithm) Shor's algorithm  can break existing cryptography with less than 2000 qubits.
The computer uses laser pulses to carry out Shor's algorithm on each atom, to correctly factor the number 15.
The algorithm has no practical application, but Tame says the work is a step toward implementing quantum software such as Shor's algorithm (SN Online: 4/10/14), which has implications for data encryption.
Shor's Algorithm with a quantum computer, however, uses exotic-sounding math -- Hadamard and Quantum Fourier Transformations -- to quickly discover the probabilities of various number pairs being the factors or keys.
While Shor's algorithm may be of more immediate utility, Grover's algorithm seems more interesting in a theoretical sense, as it highlights an area of fundamental superiority in quantum computation.
On the theoretical side, we have, as an outgrowth of Bell's theorem, the constantly improving classification of entangled states, and the development of measures of entropy and information content of such states; GHZ states, Shor's algorithm, various sorting techniques, and error-correcting codes.
This idea is exploited in Shor's algorithm, which uses a quantum Fourier transformation to obtain the period of f.
Shor's algorithm opened the doors to much more effort aimed at realizing the quantum computers' potential.
Factoring is a hard problem classically," says Preskill, "but Shor's algorithm shows that it is an easy problem quantumly.
The mechanism on which the basophils rely to detect the antibody's presence may be analogous to the device underlying Shor's algorithm or to the Grover algorithm for databank search, which is also based on Shor's ideas.
Until now, the GSA and Shor's algorithm were the only major quantum algorithms known.
Shor's algorithm exploits the ability of such systems to exist simultaneously in multiple states.