Sibling

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Sibling

(dreams)
It is very common for us to dream about all different types of people. Siblings are a fantastic source of dream material. Our siblings are important to us emotionally and psychologically. We are bound to them on some level throughout our lives; thus, they will appear in our dreams in many different forms. We learn important lessons about ourselves through our brothers and sisters. They are a reflection on us, and we can not escape their presence and their love, hate, or any other emotion. If you have many unresolved issues with your siblings, it is likely that they will frequently appear in your dreams.
References in periodicals archive ?
My friend (with a sibling with a disability) and I were conversing on things that drive us crazy about our siblings.
They were particularly interested in families with children already affected by ASD, as their siblings are known to be at a higher genetic risk of the condition, and their parents may be additionally concerned about the effects of vaccinations.
The Emirati siblings, two girls and a boy, identified as M.
7% in younger siblings of autistic children in the general U.
And just as one would expect, younger siblings see themselves as the funnier, favoured children while older siblings claim to be more successful and organised.
Through the study, researchers from Concordia University have confirmed that teaching occurs naturally and spontaneously, but that both older and younger siblings initiate learning activities and that, siblings acting as teachers use a variety of instructional techniques during these informal lessons.
an organization that has worked to ensure support for siblings of children with cancer.
But insisting that siblings can never be separated means closing the mind to the possibility that, sadly, it is sometimes necessary.
Mothers and older siblings were scored on how they interacted with the younger child.
Sibling abuse trauma; assessment and intervention strategies for children, families, and adults, 2d ed.
One of the biggest surprises of the study was that it was not the difference between being an only child and having siblings that was significant.
The study looked at the effects of physical assault with and without a weapon or injury, property aggression like stealing something or breaking a siblings' things on purpose, and psychological aggression such as saying things that made a sibling feel bad, scared, or not wanted around.